Fall 2017

History  101 Critical Thinking, History, and Zombies

Throughout the twentieth century, zombies have been one of our favorite scares. From films like Victor Halperin’s 1932 White Zombie to Marc Forster’s 2013 World War Z, from video games like Resident Evil to comic books like The Walking Dead, we have been fascinated by the reanimated dead. In many ways, what scares us tells us a lot about who we are. This class will ask the questions, “Why are we so frightened by zombies?” and “What does our fear of zombies tell us about ourselves?” We will look for answers in films, books, and other media, thinking critically about them and examining them primarily through the lenses of race, capitalism, and public health.

Lisy-Wagner T/TH 9:35-10:50

  • Fulfills GE A3- Critical Thinking Requirement
  • SF Studies SJ (Social Justice)

History 110 Western Civilization to 1500CE

It all starts here. The basis for what defines western culture, including politics, religion, science, and cuisine, begins to coalesce before 1500CE. From Mesopotamia to the Italian City-States of the Renaissance, we will be looking at how the western world defined itself and understood others, sometimes through appropriation, and sometimes through cooperation.

Pafford T/TH 12:35-1:50

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  C2-Lower Division,
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

 

History 114 World History to 1500CE

This class will examine humanities first agricultural endeavors to the first great world empires of the Classical period, to the introduction of Islam on the world stage. Developments in every aspect of the human experience are contextualized and explored using a global perspective to explore the foundations of science, politics, law, and artistic expression.

Arrieta M/W/F 10:10-11:00

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

 

History 115 World History since 1500CE

The study of World History allows us to see how globalization took shape, how something as simple as a trade route also brought advances in technology, cultural exchange and understanding, the machines of war, and new religious and spiritual belief systems. Looking at our world beyond the “New World” and “Old World” paradigm allows us to see the depth and richness of the human experience, and to connect with cultures and our own past.

Behrooz M/W 11:10-12:15

Arrieta M/W/F 2:10-3:00

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

 

History 120 US History to Reconstruction

The struggle is real! Learn how Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans vied for power in the "New World" and how gender, race, and wealth affected the social, cultural, and political development of America from the colonial period to the American Revolution, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

Englander T/TH 11:00-12:15

Leikin T/TH 2:10-3:25

Sigmon M/W/F 9:10-10:00

Sigmon M/W/F 10:10-11:00

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • Requirement for the History Major

 

History 121 US History since reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Viator M/W 11:10-12:25

Arrieta M/W/F 9:10-10:00

Arreita M/W/F 1:10-2:00

Arrieta W 4:10-6:55

Leikin T/TH 9:35-10:50

Leikin T/TH 11:10-12:25

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • Requirement for the History Major

 

History 130 US History for FOREIGN STUDENTS

PREREQUISIT: Studied US History at a non-US high school.

This course covers the breadth of US History, starting with its European roots circa 1400-1600 CE and culminating with Roosevelt’s New Deal. 

Germany M/W/F 1:10-2:00

Germany M/W/F 3:10-4:00

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: D-2 Lower Division, AI American Institutions US History for students who studied US History at a non-US high school
  • This course will NOT count towards the history major, nor will it count towards GE requirements for students who do not meet the prerequisites.

 

History 300 GWAR

PREREQUISIT: Successful Completion of ENGLISH 214.

Are you interested in how historians uncover historical documents and figure out what they mean? Do you want to know how and why historical interpretations change over time? Then join History 300 to learn the nuts and bolts of history research, analysis and writing. This is where you'll learn all the secrets about being a real historian.

Chekuri T/TH 8:10-9:25

Katz T/TH 11:10-12:25

Mabalon W 4:10-6:55

Harris M/W 12:35-1:50

  • This course is required for all History Majors, who must pass with a C or better. It cannot be taken CR/NC.
  • This course is the prerequisite for history Proseminars (HIST 640,642,644)

 

History 304 Teaching History with Comics

Once they were censored and banned.  Now, graphic novels and comic books are recognized as both sources for understanding the past and -- in some cases -- histories in their own right.  This is a class about how to teach history at the high school or college level using comic books.  In this course, you will learn about four important world events from graphic novels: the colonialism and slavery in West Africa, the Cultural Revolution in China, the Holocaust, and the dropping of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima.  Equally, you will learn important lessons about teaching history, and even devise your own lesson plans around a topic of your choice.  All of this material will prepare you for the day when you become a serious developer of comic books for the classroom or teach classes of your own!

Getz T/TH 9:35-10:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Africa, Asia, or Europe after 1500

 

History 320 Archaic and Classical Greece

Democracy, philosophy, togas – these are some of the hallmarks of ancient Greece. But these are only a part of what made early Greek society unique. In this class, we will explore ancient Greece from the early Mycenaean kingdoms and their collapse to the resurgence of Greek power in the Archaic and Classical periods. The Greeks arose as a distant people in an already ancient world, both learning from and challenging older more established powers. Greek cultural and political developments resulted in a formidable people who alone could stand up to the power of the mighty Persian Empire. Their potential was only limited by their inability to work together – a fractiousness that resulted in civil war. In this class, we will look at the political and social developments of the Greeks from their earliest historical period to the end of the Peloponnesian War, which ushered in the era of Alexander the Great. Numerous primary sources will be used to explore the ancient Greeks and how they saw themselves and the world that they inhabited.

Campbell T/TH 12:35-1:50

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500

 

History 323 Imperial Rome

The Roman Empire from the death of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C.E. to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 C.E. In addition to political and military developments, this course will focus on the demographic, technological, religious and social changes, which are characteristic of the later phases of classical antiquity.  The status of women, slaves and non-citizen populations will be extensively explored, and the interrelated nature of the larger Mediterranean world will be a special focus.

Campbell T/TH 9:35-10:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500, or Empire and Imperialism

 

History 331 The High Middle Ages

Ever wonder where all your favorite books, movies and TV shows got their inspiration? Then come explore the Middle Ages, without which our pop culture would mostly consist of lawyer dramas, reality TV, "talent” competitions, and cat GIFs. Also, learn about the origins of modern systems of government, education, law, culture, and thought.

Kennedy T/TH 9:35-10:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500

 

History 336 The Reformation

Five hundred years ago, on Halloween 1517, Martin Luther posted 95 Theses on the door to the Wittenberg Cathedral, calling for a public debate about the Church’s practice of selling indulgences. He intended it to be more like a poster for a group meeting than a call to revolution (or so he claimed!), but it became the first shot in a war that would splinter the Catholic Church into a dizzying number of confessions. The first part of this course will center on Luther’s rebellion, looking in-depth at his thought and life, his predecessors and successors. We will then also look at other types of religious reformations in this era – including Calvinist, Anabaptist, and Catholic reform. We will examine the ways in which religious reform transformed charity and social welfare, the power of the nation-state, law and standards of proof, and the relationship of Europe to the wider world. We will think about how Reformation Europe related both to other regions, such as the Ottoman Empire and the New World, and to internal Other(s), such as women and Jews.

Lisy-Wagner T/TH 12:35-1:50

  • Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science
  • SF Studies: Global Perspectives (GP)
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe after 1500

 

History 348 Modern European Intellectual and Cultural History

This course combines philosophy, art history, literature, political thought, and a little bit of science to create a history of ideas in Europe from the Enlightenment to post-modernism.  Find out why Rousseau thought children should play with knives, why Victorians were shocked by Darwin’s theory of evolution, why Nietzsche thought God was dead, and how World War I soldiers invented irony.  Learn the difference between Romantic, Impressionistic, and Modern art.  Discover how European intellectuals responded to the horrors of the Holocaust and the Algerian War.  Readings include Frankenstein, The Time Machine, Freud on psychoanalysis, and 1984 as well as many shorter texts.  Required weekly reading assignments vital to vibrant class discussion.

Curtis T/TH 2:10-3:25

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe after 1500
HUM 375 Paris, Biography of a City
 
Have you ever been to Paris?  Want to go to Paris?  Travel vicariously to Paris in this humanities course that traces the history of Paris through literature, architecture, painting, music, film, and memoir.  We will trace three themes in particular: 1) Paris as a city of protest and revolution, 2) Paris as the world capital of avant-garde art and culture, 3) the physical transformation of the city itself from a medieval metropolis to the capital of modernity.  
 
 Curtis T/TH 2:10-3:25
 
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP) 
  • Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500.  Please note that you may only use six non-History designated courses towards the fulfillment of the major.  
 

390 World Wars: 1918-1945

A survey of world politics in the era of the world wars.  We consider  the proposition that world war one was not an accident, as is commonly so much as the climax of the imperial scrambles of the nineteenth century, in effect, the final chapter of a scramble for the world.  Out of the mutinies against the relentless slaughter, the Russian revolution brought the Bolsheviks to power with a message of anti-imperialist revolution.  Among the European responses was Mussolini and Italian fascism.  We examine fascist ideas, especially their cultural and spiritual appeals, and their impact on Hitler and Nazism.  We make a serious attempt to understand the causes and the mechanics of the great Depression and different nationalist models of economy, including Roosevelt's New Deal.  We consider Hitler's march toward war and British and French appeasement.  We end with an unorthodox interpretation of the politics behind the great decisions of world war two.  The course attempts a global perspective, weighs the balance of power in terms of the balance of ideas, tries to find some rationality in the chaos of events, and tries to explode, or at least put into perspective, a number of widespread myths.  Contributions from thoughtful students welcome, outrageous ideas entertained.

 

Dr. D’agostino T/TH 12:35-1:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe after 1500

 

History 420 American Colonial History

This course argues that colonial America is a myth – a politically useful but historically inaccurate portrait of early North America.  We discuss how this myth was created and why it has persisted, while also exploring the real people, places, and events that characterize the American colonies.  The class is divided loosely into thirds: the first section re-examines the relationships between American Indians and Europeans in borderland regions, the second narrates the emergence of a slave society in the English colonies, and the third asks how the thirteen colonies thought of themselves as part of and, eventually, separate from the British Empire.

Dr. Crabtree T/TH 11:10-12:25

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis US

 

History 422 The American Revolution

Join up for the true tale of how and why a bunch of colonial amateurs took on the most powerful empire in the world, and find out how slaves, women, Native Americans, and the Continental Congress shaped the founding of the United States.

Dr. Wolf M/W 12:35-1:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 424 History of the US 1827-1877

In this class, we will be studying the Jacksonian Era, the Antebellum Era, and the Civil War and Reconstruction Era.  We will take a close look at the rise of the market economy, the development of chattel slavery, the roots of social reform movements, the causes of the Civil War, and the aftermath of the Civil War.  While this is not a class on military history, we will spend some time discussing some of the major battles of the Civil War.  We will also carefully consider the careers of Andrew Jackson and Abraham Lincoln. 

Dr. Sigmon M/W 2:10-3:25

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 426 History of the US 1877-1916

Between the end of the Civil War and the start of World War One, the United States was transformed from a farming and rural society into an industrial, urban, world power. This course explores how different groups of Americans experienced this transformation. Its key themes will include radicals and reformers; race relations and immigration; women’s rights and feminism; and the rise of corporate power and the growth of the national state.

Dr. Postel M/W 11:10-12:25

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 428 US After 1945

The Bomb. Backyard barbecues. Lunch counter sit-ins. Stonewall. The March on Washington. The Kennedy Assassination. The Suburbs. The Sexual Revolution. Vietnam. The Black Freedom Struggle. From Truman to Obama, the postwar suburbs and urban redevelopment, shopping malls to drive-in movies, from Watergate to Iran Contra and from the Cold War to the War on Terror -- this course covers the major political, economic, social, cultural and diplomatic themes and topics in United States history from the end of World War II to the 1970s. In particular, we will focus on the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and American foreign policy after World War II, social movements, suburbanization and urban redevelopment, changing gender roles, civil rights and identity politics, the resurgence of conservatism, race and racism, and the impact of immigration. Throughout the course, we will examine issues of race and racial oppression, gender and sexism, identity, class and culture in postwar America.

Dr. Mabalon M/W 2:10-3:25

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 450 History of California

 

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.”

Dr. Livie ONLINE

Dr. Viator M/W 2:10-3:25

Dr. Sigmon M 4:10 – 6:55

Dr. Sigmon W 4:10-6:55

  • Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science, AI California State and Local Government
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 451 Bay Area History and Society

Exploration of the Bay Area, specifically San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Jose, from a sociohistorical and global perspective. Exploration of various dimensions of the bay area's human and environmental composition and history, paying special attention to the built environment, immigration, globalization, race, and class.

Dr. Haskaj ONLINE

  • Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science
  • SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM)
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 455 US and the Philippines

In 2016, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte shocked the world by calling President Obama the son of a whore and declaring that the Philippines would no longer ally itself with the U.S. This break is major, considering the long relationship between these two countries. Many Americans don't even realize that the Philippines was a colony of the United States for much of the 20th century. In 1948, the US had the largest military bases in the world in the Philippines. According to the 2010 Census, Filipinos are the largest Asian Pacific American immigrant group in California and the second largest in the US. This class explores the century-plus imperial and neo-imperial relationship between the United States and the Philippines, beginning with the Philippine Revolution in 1896, the brutal Philippine-American War and conquest of the Philippines, and continuing through early migration within the American empire from the Philippines to Hawaii and the mainland U.S., World War II, the U.S.-sponsored Marcos Dictatorship, the U.S.-based Anti-Martial Law Movement, and ending with the War on Terror and the Duterte presidency.

Dr. Mabalon M/W 11:10-12:25

  • Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-C Arts and Humanities AI US Government
  • SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM), Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 460 US Foreign Relations to 1913

Want to learn more about how thirteen colonies on the eastern seaboard of North America became a continental and global empire in just over 100 years?  We’ll study many aspects US foreign relations from the revolutionary period to the outbreak of World War I, including interactions with Native Americans, territorial and economic expansion, and cultural diplomacy.

Elkind M/W 12:35-1:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 464 American Ethnic and Racial Relations to 1890

This course provides a historical introduction to one of the issues that currently vexes our society most: race. But “race” is a relatively new term; in fact, it is an idea that grew out the colonial history of the Americas, where European-descended people invoked their own superiority to justify their domination over those with Native American or African ancestry, and where English people thought themselves superior to Irish or Spanish people. This course traces that history in the places that became part of the United States and examines British-American and US history in comparison to French- and Spanish-American history from the 1600s to the 1880s.

Wolf M/W 9:35-10:50

  • Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM), Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 470 US Constitution to 1877

“Four [eleven] score and seven [ten] years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in ... testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure."

Using historical reenacting games and mini-moot courts, we will see if we can come to understand the mix of people, principles, and politics that produced the single most important document of the past 250 years, as well as some of the key early efforts to interpret it. Perhaps we can better participate in the latest round of debates.

Harris W 4:10-6:55

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government
  • SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

 

History 471 US Constitution to 1877

In the summer of 2016, Muslim American Khizr Khan, the father of a U.S. soldier who had died in Afghanistan, famously asked Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump if he had even read the U.S. Constitution. In this class, students read the Constitution and study its history from the late nineteenth century to the present. We focus in particular on debates and discussions about the rights of immigrants, indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, poor people, racial minorities, sexual and gender minorities, women, and workers.  In this class, students read the Constitution and study its history from the late nineteenth century to the present with an emphasis on the Bill of Rights.

Englander T 4:10-6:55

Englander TH 4:10-6:55

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government
  • SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

 

History 472 The Courts, Politics and Social change in U.S. History, 1880-2000

This course will examine selected watershed moments in American history from the late 19th and 20th centuries through the transcripts and historiographical treatments of major trials.  The court cases to be examined will include the Haymarket Anarchists trial, the Scopes trial, the Korematsu internment case, the Loving decision of 1967 and Roe v. Wade.  Each case will open a window on specific political, social and/or economic changes in American life.  The cases will also shed light on the place of political radicalism in America, the counterpoint of science and religion in the public sphere, the power of the state and the limitations on free speech in wartime, the meaning of marriage in American society and the changing roles of women in the 20th century.  We will examine how the courts, over this long time period, have acted as both agents of change and as enforcers of the status quo. 

Leikin TH 4:10-6:55

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

 

History 481 Thought and Culture in America 1880 to the Present

What is intellectual and cultural history? Whose history is it? And why does it matter? This course explores these questions. It is organized around the reading of fiction, philosophy, and social commentary representing a wide range of schools of thought. It will cover the positivist and pragmatist thinkers of the turn of the century; the inter-war Lost Generation and Harlem Renaissance; the post-war Beats, feminists, and New Left; and the post-colonial and modern conservative intellectual movements. There will also be a film interlude, looking at New Deal culture through the lens of 1930s Hollywood.

Postel M/W 9:35-10:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 482 Religion in America

Has anyone ever told you to avoid talking about religion or politics?  Well, this course does both.  We take as our starting point the religious diversity of the American colonies, exploring the survival of Native American and African religions, the introduction of Islam to North America, and the role of the rivalry between Protestantism and Catholicism.  We will then discuss evangelical movements in the nineteenth century, examine how the Civil War empowered nonbelievers, and analyze the effect of Jewish and Asian immigration.   Finally, we will look at the rise of mega-churches and store-front churches in the twentieth century, think carefully about the close relationship between religion and science in the twenty-first century, and debate the identity of Americans as “spiritual but not religious.”

Crabtree T/TH 2:10-3:25

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US, or Religion and Society

 

History 500 Colonial Latin America

This course prompts students to understand the experiences created by the Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule in the Americas.  Students are encouraged to explore the lives and political behaviors of the African-American, European-American, indigenous, and mestizo “peoples that formed societies in colonial Latin American by chance and by design” between 1492 and 1823.  Special consideration is also given to the legacy of Spanish America in the formation of the United States

Morrison M/W 12:35-1:50

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Latin America

 

History 570 Imperial China

Do you believe that China was the first country on earth to enter modernity? Do you know that humor can be a subject of serious historical study? The purpose of this course is to journey through Imperial China from 900 to 1700 to investigate the disappearance of the aristocracy, the construction of state bureaucracy, the evolution of the ethical teaching of Neo-Confucianism, the integration of China into world economy, the onslaught of “barbarian” rules, the interactions with Southeast Asia, Japan, and the West, the changing gender relations, and the rise of vernacular literature (including jokes). So buckle up!

Hsu M/W 9:35-10:50

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: China or Asia

 

History 571 History of Modern China

*This is the last time Dr. Hsu will be teaching this class!*

In the 17th-20th centuries, the combination of political disturbances within and Western penetration from without produced crises of social and cultural disintegration throughout most of Asia.  How did China, the oldest continuous civilization on earth, respond to such crises? This course investigates the search for modernity in China’s recent history from 1600 down to the present.  We study how China has been adapting and changing, while preserving some of its immutable social-cultural values.  We evaluate the impacts of the Nationalist and Communist Revolutions, and explore the relations of China, the United States, and Taiwan.  We also look at the complex landscape of contemporary Chinese politics, economy, society, and international relations.

Hsu M/W 12:35-1:50

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: China or Asia

 

History 572 Taiwan: History and Memory

Why is the small island nation (which is not even recognized as a nation) of Taiwan worth studying? Why does Taiwan rank higher in gender equality and happiness than China, Japan, and South Korea despite the lack of nation status and the constant military threats of People’s Republic of China? This course explores Taiwan’s colonial legacies, ethnic tensions, democratization, as well as social, cultural, economic, and environmental developments through a historical study of documentary and feature films as well as nostalgic and nativist short stories.

Hsu M 4:10-6:55

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP) Environmental Sustainability (ES)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: China or Asia

 

History 582 Tales From Ancient India: Hinduism and Buddhism

This is a class on classical India through the Mahabharata. It's a real enjoyable reading, almost like reading Harry Potter (at least that's what the students said).  Mahabharata is the key to understanding Buddhism and Hinduism. Students who have an interest in the classics (Greek or Chinese or Islamic) will most definitely enjoy this course.

Chekuri T/TH 8:10-9:25

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Religion and Society, India or Asia

 

History 585 India since Gandhi

India/South Asia is home to more than one-fourth of the world’s population and to the some of the most diverse ethnicities, languages, religions, and political philosophies. It is home to the largest and most diverse Muslim and Hindu populations in the world.  It is home to more languages than Europe. It is simultaneously home to the largest democracy in the world (US is second!), and the largest military with nuclear arms-and has a history of intense conflicts.

This course will examine the everyday lives of ordinary people in India through memoir, biography, and journalism. In the course of the semester, you will gain an understanding of subaltern lives—of gender, caste, and class—in Indian society. Through a closer examination of these individuals living at the outermost edges of society, we will gain an understanding of an India that is struggling to keep up with the impact of economic globalization and social hierarchy.

Chekuri T/TH 2:10-3:25

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: India or Asia

 

History 588 History of Southeast Asia

Join us for a voyage to Southeast Asia, one of the most diverse and interesting regions in the world.  We’ll explore the cultural, political, and social histories of societies from Burma to Vietnam to the Philippines.  And you’ll learn about how this area became a global crossroads where local practices have mixed with Chinese, Indian, European, and American influences.

Elkind M/W 11:1-12:25

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia

 

History 604 Islamic World I: 500-1500

This is a study of Islamic civilization, culture and history from 500 to 1700 CE.  The course assumes no prior knowledge of Islam or Middle Eastern history.  The course emphasizes on a core region of the Islamic world (the area between Nile and Oxus rivers).  The first part of the course begins with an investigation of the pre-Islamic world and goes on to survey the rise of Islam as a religion and an empire.  Next, the golden age of Islamic civilization, covering the Umayyad Empire (centered in Damascus) and the Abbasid Empire (centered in Baghdad), will be covered.  The second half of the course will examine the Islamic civilization from the decline of the Abbasid Empire (950 CE) through the establishment of regional empires, the Crusades, the Mongol invasion and the emergence of the "gun-powder empires."  The course will pay special attention to cultural and religious development in the Islamic world, as well as political changes.  Students will be able to discuss and analyze the rise of Islam both as religion and civilization.  Students will examine ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversities of the Islamic civilization. 

Behrooz M 4:10-6:55

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Middle East

 

History 606 History of Iran and Afghanistan 1500 to Present

This course is a historical study of Iran and Afghanistan from the rise of the Safavid Empire in 1501 C.E. to the present.  The course begins with a historical background on the Iranian and Perso-Islamic cultural presence in the eastern half of the Islamic world and the geographic area known as Iranian plateau.  Then, the Safavid Empire's history and rise of Shi’ism in the region plus Safavid politics and society will be examined.  Next, Iran in the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries and the birth of Afghanistan as a separate entity will be covered.  Here Iranian and Afghan societies will be examined in light of disruption, colonial subjugation, reform and rebellion under the Afshars, the Zands and the Qajars and Dorrani shah’s in Afghanistan.  The final part of the course will examine Iran and Afghanistan in the twentieth century.  Subjects such as the two Iranian revolutions in the twentieth century, the Oil Nationalization Movement, the Iranian Communist movement and the rise of political Islam as well as Afghanistan’s reforms, Soviet invasion, civil war and the rise of Taliban will be the main focus of this part.

Behrooz  M/W 2:10-3:25

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Middle East

 

PROSEMINARS (HIST 640/642/644)

Prerequisite requirement for all Proseminars is the successful completion of History 300 GWAR with a grade of “C” or better.

 

History 640.1  Witches and the Occult in the Early Modern World

Witches, vampires, walking dead, mad scientists turning base metals into gold... the early modern period was marked by an intense involvement with the occult. This proseminar will investigate witchcraft and the occult in early modern Europe and beyond. We will be interested not only in the European witch hunts, but also other topics relating to ideas about the supernatural in this time period. Among our readings topics will be the origins and consequences of the sixteenth-century witch craze, vampires and attitudes toward the dead, religious mysticism, and the pseudo-sciences like alchemy and astrology.

Lisy-Wager TH 4:10-6:55

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500, or Sexuality, Gender, and the Body

 

History 640.2 Roman Empire: Gender and Politics

The Roman Empire was a vast power that lasted for hundreds of years. This pro-seminar will focus on the period of the “twelve Caesars” from 31 BC to AD 96, with the primary focus being on the Julian-Claudian Dynasty (the first five emperors: Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero). The seminar is devoted to the examination of identity and is divided into two sections. For the first half of the course we will explore how Roman historians depicted these emperors. We will read historical and biographical pieces, especially Suetonius and Tacitus, in order to develop and understanding of who these rulers were, and why the authors treated them as they did. We will devote extra focus on Caligula and Nero, two of the “bad” emperors. The second half of the course will explore the issue of Roman morality, especially sexual morality. We will read through the works of Juvenal, Petronius (the Satyricon), and the poetry of Ovid, to develop an idea of what Roman sexuality morality was. We will look at how Roman concept of gender, especially masculinity is in flux during this period, and how this affected the depictions of various individuals, especially the emperors, in the ancient histories and biographies.

Campbell T 4:10-6:55

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe before 1500, Sexuality, Gender, and the Body, or Empire and Imperialism

 

History 642 Conservative Movement

Is Donald Trump a conservative? This course will address that question by tracing the historical development of the modern conservative movement in the U.S. over the last half-century. It will look at the movement from the vantage point of the leaders as well as grass roots mobilization, and explore the role of economics, race, gender, and religion. Both in the readings and research assignments, the aim is to gain a deeper understanding of the ideas, goals, and motivations of the men and women who have made the conservative movement such a powerful force in American life.

Postel W 4:10-6:55

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

 

History 644.1 Social History of Veterans

Veterans occupy a complex place between being celebrated as heroes and rejected as reminders of wars that societies hope to forget. This proseminar will look at the history of veterans beginning with ancient times and ending with recent wars. What aspects of being a veteran remain constant over time? And what distinctive social, economic, and political forces shape the experiences of vets and responses to them? We will also explore factors such as physical and mental disabilities, the role of community, what happens to conscientious objectors, and how race, social class, gender, and sexuality shape this history. Assignments will include weekly response pieces to work by historians, fiction, memoirs, and film as well as a final research paper of approximately 20-25 pages as well as an oral presentation

Kudlick M/W 11:10-12:25

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

 

History 644.2 Transnational Feminism

Are you interested in transnational history – in the relationships of people across national and cultural borders?  Do you know that women activists from different parts of the globe have been collaborating to advance women’s rights and related movements for social justice since at least the 1840s?  In this course, you will have the opportunity to research an amazing transnational women’s coalition.  You could examine efforts to achieve women’s suffrage, to advance women’s labor rights, to work for international peace, to achieve greater reproductive justice, to eliminate violence against women, to combat women’s poverty, among many other issues.  You will explore the ways in which women’s transnational formations worked to bridge differences among women and to construct shared definitions of “women’s rights as human rights.”  You will investigate their internal conflicts as well as their successful collaborations, including how global power relations and differences in culture impacted their coalition-building efforts. 

Katz T/TH 2:10-3:25

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, Gender, Sexuality, and the Body, Africa, Europe after 1500, or Latin America