Fall 2018 Course Catalog

HIST 101 Critical Thinking: Critical Thinking, History, and Zombies 

Throughout the twentieth century, zombies have been one of our favorite scares. From films like Victor Halperin’s 1932 White Zombie to Marc Forster’s 2013 World War Z, from video games like Resident Evil to comic books like The Walking Dead, we have been fascinated by the reanimated dead. In many ways, what scares us tells us a lot about who we are. This class will ask the questions, “Why are we so frightened by zombies?” and “What does our fear of zombies tell us about ourselves?” We will look for answers in films, books, and other media, thinking critically about them and examining them primarily through the lenses of race, capitalism, and public health.

Lisy-Wagner T/TH, 9:30- 10:45

Fulfills GE A3- Critical Thinking Requirement

SF Studies SJ (Social Justice)

HIST 101 Critical Thinking: Democracy

What did Socrates say about democracy? What did Nelson Mandela say?

What would you say if you were talking to them and their colleagues?

We will find out, because in this course we will be using two historical re-enactment game—Athens 403BC and South Africa 1993—to explore the changing nature of democracy. In each game, each of you will be assigned a specific role informed by real historical events and the ideas of important thinkers and political leaders. You will critically analyze those events and ideas; then argue, write, negotiate, and, hopefully, resolve the pressing issues of the day.

We start with some preliminary workshops on history, critical thinking, and public speaking, and spend some time getting grounded in each game’s situation, but much of the time we be ‘in the game.’ It’s a lot more fun, rewarding, and challenging than sitting taking notes all the time.

This is the first time this way of doing history has been available to SFSU Freshmen.

Harris T/TH 2:00 – 3:15

Fulfills GE A3- Critical Thinking Requirement

SF Studies SJ (Social Justice)

History 110 Western Civilization to 1500CE
It all starts here. The basis for what defines western culture, including politics, religion, science, and cuisine, begins to coalesce before 1500CE. From Mesopotamia to the Italian City-States of the Renaissance, we will be looking at how the western world defined itself and understood others, sometimes through appropriation, and sometimes through cooperation.

Rodriguez, M/W, 2:00- 3:15
Fulfills the following GE requirements:  C2-Lower Division,
SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

History 111 Western Civilization since 1500 CE

This course treats the development of thought, culture, and institutions in Europe from about 1500 to the present.  Among the topics to be considered are the Renaissance, the reformation, the emergence of the nation state as a replacement for medieval kingdoms and empires, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the impact of Napoleon, the spread of European culture throughout the world as a result of imperialism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the two great twentieth century wars that devastated Europe.

Harris, T/TH, 12:30- 1:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  C2-Lower Division,
SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

History 114 World History to 1500CE

This class will examine humanities first agricultural endeavors to the first great world empires of the Classical period, to the introduction of Islam on the world stage. Developments in every aspect of the human experience are contextualized and explored using a global perspective to explore the foundations of science, politics, law, and artistic expression. 

Arrieta, M/W, 12:00- 12:50

Arrieta, W, 4:00- 6:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

History 115 World History since 1500CE

The study of World History allows us to see how globalization took shape, how something as simple as a trade route also brought advances in technology, cultural exchange and understanding, the machines of war, and new religious and spiritual belief systems. Looking at our world beyond the “New World” and “Old World” paradigm allows us to see the depth and richness of the human experience, and to connect with cultures and our own past.

Behrooz, M/W, 11:00- 12:15

Morrison, M/W, 9:30- 10:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

History 120 US History to Reconstruction

The struggle is real! Learn how Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans vied for power in the "New World" and how gender, race, and wealth affected the social, cultural, and political development of America from the colonial period to the American Revolution, the Civil War, Native settlement and conquest, and Reconstruction.

Crabtree, T, 4:00- 6:45

Arrieta, M/W, 10:00- 10:50

Leikin, T/TH, 9:30- 10:45

Arrieta, M/W, 1:00- 1:50

Corea, T/TH, 12:30- 1:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

Requirement for the History Major

History 121 US History since Reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Viator, M/W, 12:30- 1:45

Leikin, T/TH, 11:00- 12:15

Leikin, T/TH, 2:00- 3:15

Arrieta, M/W, 9:00- 9:50

Sigmon, M/W, 11:00- 12:15

Postel, T/TH, 11:00- 12:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

Requirement for the History Major

History 130 US History for FOREIGN STUDENTS

PREREQUISITE: Studied US History at a non-US high school.

This course covers the breadth of US History, starting with its European roots circa 1400-1600 CE and culminating with Roosevelt’s New Deal.  

Germany, M/W, 1:00- 1:50

Germany, M/W, 3:00- 3:50

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D-2 Lower Division, AI American Institutions US History

This course will NOT count towards the history major, nor will it count towards GE requirements for students who do not meet the prerequisites.

HIST 278 History of Latinos in the U.S. (Units: 3)

Examination of the social-cultural, economic, and political foundations of Latino History from the Spanish colonial period to the present. 
(This course is offered as LTNS 278 and HIST 278. Students may not repeat the course under an alternate prefix.)

Mercado, T/TH, 8:00- 9:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: US History, D2 Social Sciences, Am. Ethnic and Racial Minorities, Social Justice

History 300 GWAR

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of ENGLISH 214.

Are you interested in how historians uncover historical documents and figure out what they mean?  Do you want to know how and why historical interpretations change over time?  Then join History 300 to learn the nuts and bolts of history research, analysis and writing.  This is where you'll learn all the secrets about being a real historian.

Katz, T/TH, 11:00 - 12:15

HSU, T/TH, 12:30- 1:45

Mabalon, M/W, 2:00 – 3:15

Wolf, W, 4:00- 6:45

This course is required for all History Majors, who must pass with a C or better.  It cannot be taken CR/NC.

This course is the prerequisite for history Proseminars (HIST 640,642,644)

History 315 History of Science from the Scientific Revolution to the Present (Full)

Europeans’ discovery of the Americas (which had, of course, long been known to indigenous Americans!), provided an epistemological shock to intellectuals throughout Europe. The Greek and Roman thinkers which provided the basis for Renaissance knowledge had not known about the Americas, had not even guessed at them. Over the course of the early modern period, experience became the most important source of knowledge, rather than ancient texts. The foundations of modern science were laid on this new and growing emphasis on experience and experiments as the sites of knowledge production. As industrialization began to take hold, the development of science and technology escalated. People began to understand their universe in ways incomprehensible to the natural philosophers of the early modern period, and with modern technologies began to exploit their world’s natural resources on an unprecedented scale. This course will start with what historians have (perhaps problematically) called the Scientific Revolution and follow the story through to the present day. The narrative will largely focus on scientific developments in Europe and the United States, but will strive to incorporate connections with Africa, Asia, and Latin America and to respect the scientific traditions in those regions. The course will also look at the symbiotic relationship between people and the environment, focusing both on the ways that humans impact their environment and the ways that the natural world impacts human events.

Pena-Guzman, M/W, 9:30- 10:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities

SF Studies Environmental Sustainability (ES) and Global Perspectives (GP)

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  US or Europe after 1500

History 320 Archaic and Classical Greece

Democracy, philosophy, togas – these are some of the hallmarks of ancient Greece. But these are only a part of what made early Greek society unique. In this class, we will explore ancient Greece from the early Mycenaean kingdoms and their collapse to the resurgence of Greek power in the Archaic and Classical periods. The Greeks arose as a distant people in an already ancient world, both learning from and challenging older more established powers. Greek cultural and political developments resulted in a formidable people who alone could stand up to the power of the mighty Persian Empire. Their potential was only limited by their inability to work together – a fractiousness that resulted in civil war. In this class, we will look at the political and social developments of the Greeks from their earliest historical period to the end of the Peloponnesian War, which ushered in the era of Alexander the Great. Numerous primary sources will be used to explore the ancient Greeks and how they saw themselves and the world that they inhabited.

Dr. Campbell, T/TH, 9:30- 10:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500

History 323 Imperial Rome

The Roman Empire from the death of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C.E. to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 C.E. In addition to political and military developments, this course will focus on the demographic, technological, religious and social changes, which are characteristic of the later phases of classical antiquity.  The status of women, slaves and non-citizen populations will be extensively explored, and the interrelated nature of the larger Mediterranean world will be a special focus.

Pafford, T, 4:00- 6:45
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500, Empire and Imperialism

History 331 The High Middle Ages

Ever wonder where all your favorite books, movies and TV shows got their inspiration? Then come explore the middle Ages, without which our pop culture would mostly consist of lawyer dramas, reality to, "talent” competitions, and cat GIFs. Also, learn about the origins of modern systems of government, education, law, culture, and thought.

Rodriguez, 4:00- 6:45
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500

History 347 Women in Modern Europe

“I read it [history] a little as a duty; but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me.  The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all, it is very tiresome” (Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey).   This course is not tiresome at all: learn about extraordinary and ordinary European women from the eighteenth century to the present through fiction, memoirs, and manifestos as well as individual research projects.  In addition to restoring women's voices to history, we will examine well-known historical events from the perspective of women's history, look at ideas about women, and examine the historical roots of issues and debates still informing the lives of European women.  Until we reach the twentieth century, we will be looking exclusively at Britain and France; after 1914, we will also consider women’s experiences in Russia, Germany, and (to a lesser extent) Italy and Spain

Curtis, T/TH, 9:30- 10:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Art and Humanities, Global Perspectives, Social Justice,

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe After 1500

History 348 Modern European Intellectual and Cultural History

This course combines philosophy, art history, literature, political thought, and a little bit of science to create a history of ideas in Europe from the Enlightenment to post-modernism.  Find out why Rousseau thought children should play with knives, why Victorians were shocked by Darwin’s theory of evolution, why Nietzsche thought God was dead, and how World War I soldiers invented irony.  Learn the difference between Romantic, Impressionistic, and Modern art.  Discover how European intellectuals responded to the horrors of the Holocaust and the Algerian War.  Readings include Frankenstein, The Time Machine, Freud on psychoanalysis, and 1984 as well as many shorter texts.  Required weekly reading assignments vital to vibrant class discussion.

Curtis T/TH 2:00-3:15

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe after 1500

390 World Wars: 1918-1945

World politics in the era of the world wars.  The course investigates all the nefarious and tumultuous events of the period by following the great imperial powers as they pursue their interests according to the idea of the balance of power.  World War One is seen as a climax of a global imperial competition and an existential crisis for western civilization, the Russian revolution as a mutiny against the slaughter of millions in four years of war.  We trace the outlines of a ragged peace stemming from allied fear of the revolution and the rise of the power of the USA.  Britain and France vie for control of Mideast oil and Germany figures as a factor in their struggle.  Mussolini’s Fascism emerges to the applause of sophisticated opinion as an answer to the strength of socialism and democracy.  Revolution continues in China.  We look at the Great Depression of the thirties in terms of the rivalry of the powers and consider France’s role in starting the whole thing.  We review the various alternative ideological models for dealing with the apparent fall of capitalism.  We follow Hitler on the war path and ask why he was almost unopposed.  We consider the politics of World War Two as a clash between British and US globalist aims and ideas about imperialism and Soviet Communism.  Texts include D’Agostino, The Rise of Global Powers; Carsten, Rise of Fascism; Yergin, The Prize.           

D’agostino, TH, 4:00- 6:45

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe after 1500

History 405 Maritime History

Ahoy! In addition to employing terrible sea-related puns all semester, this class explores the history of the ocean and our relationship with it.  We will begin by examining the role of the sea and the seashore in the encounter between Europeans and American Indians, the Golden Age of piracy, and the "middle passage" of the transatlantic slave trade.  We will then turn to think about the industrialization of the ocean, covering topics ranging from whaling and fishing to cruise ships to Barbara Streisand’s beach house.  We also spend a day on mermaids! 

Crabtree, T/TH, 2:00- 3:15

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500, US, Latin America, Africa

HIST 416 The Jewish Sixties: A Journey Through The Social Protest Movements of the 1960s

Explores the Jewish Sixties through the thematic lens of religion, history, and sociology. Divides the Sixties into two historical epochs: 1954-1964 and 1965-1980. In the first period examines consensus-based race relations with attention to the modern struggle for racial equality as well as leftist critics of Cold War America. The second era explores the radicalization of social reform efforts with careful attention to the rise of the New Left, Vietnam protests and counterculture.
(This course is offered as JS 548 and HIST 416. Students may not repeat the course under an alternate prefix.)

T/TH, 11:00- 12:15

History 420 American Colonial History

This course argues that colonial America is a myth – a politically useful but historically inaccurate portrait of early North America.  We discuss how this myth was created and why it has persisted, while also exploring the real people, places, and events that characterize the American colonies.  The class is divided loosely into thirds: the first section re-examines the relationships between American Indians and Europeans in borderland regions, the second narrates the emergence of a slave society in the English colonies, and the third asks how the thirteen colonies thought of themselves as part of and, eventually, separate from the British Empire.

Crabtree, T/TH, 11:00- 12:15

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 422 The American Revolution

Join up for the true tale of how and why a bunch of colonial amateurs took on the most powerful empire in the world, and find out how slaves, women, Native Americans, and the Continental Congress shaped the founding of the United States.

Wolf M/W 12:30- 1:45

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 426 History of the US 1877-1916

Between the end of the Civil War and the start of World War One, the United States was transformed from a farming and rural society into an industrial, urban, world power. This course explores how different groups of Americans experienced this transformation. Its key themes will include radicals and reformers; race relations and immigration; women’s rights and feminism; and the rise of corporate power and the growth of the national state.

Postel M/W 2:00- 3:15

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 428 US After 1945

The Bomb. Backyard barbecues. Lunch counter sit-ins. Stonewall. The March on Washington. The Kennedy Assassination. The Suburbs. The Sexual Revolution. Vietnam. The Black Freedom Struggle. From Truman to Obama, the postwar suburbs and urban redevelopment, shopping malls to drive-in movies, from Watergate to Iran Contra and from the Cold War to the War on Terror -- this course covers the major political, economic, social, cultural and diplomatic themes and topics in United States history from the end of World War II to the 1970s. In particular, we will focus on the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and American foreign policy after World War II, social movements, suburbanization and urban redevelopment, changing gender roles, civil rights and identity politics, the resurgence of conservatism, race and racism, and the impact of immigration. Throughout the course, we will examine issues of race and racial oppression, gender and sexism, identity, class and culture in postwar America.

Mabalon, M/W, 4:00- 6:45

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 450 History of California

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.”

Sigmon, W, 4:00- 6:45

Sigmon, M, 4:00- 6:45

Englander, T/TH, 12:30- 1:45

Livie, On Line

Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science, AI California State and Local Government
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 451 Bay Area History and Society

Exploration of the Bay Area, specifically San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Jose, from a sociohistorical and global perspective. Exploration of various dimensions of the bay area's human and environmental composition and history, paying special attention to the built environment, immigration, globalization, race, and class.

Dr. Haskaj ONLINE

Livie, T, 6:00- 8:45
Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science
SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM)
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 455 US and the Philippines

In 2016, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte shocked the world by calling President Obama the son of a whore and declaring that the Philippines would no longer ally itself with the U.S. This break is major, considering the long relationship between these two countries. Many Americans don't even realize that the Philippines was a colony of the United States for much of the 20th century. In 1948, the US had the largest military bases in the world in the Philippines. According to the 2010 Census, Filipinos are the largest Asian Pacific American immigrant group in California and the second largest in the US. This class explores the century-plus imperial and neo-imperial relationship between the United States and the Philippines, beginning with the Philippine Revolution in 1896, the brutal Philippine-American War and conquest of the Philippines, and continuing through early migration within the American empire from the Philippines to Hawaii and the mainland U.S., World War II, the U.S.-sponsored Marcos Dictatorship, the U.S.-based Anti-Martial Law Movement, and ending with the War on Terror and the Duterte presidency.

Mabalon M/W 11:00-12:15

Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-C Arts and Humanities AI US Government
SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM), Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 464 American Ethnic and Racial Relations to 1890

This course provides a historical introduction to one of the issues that currently vexes our society most: race. But “race” is a relatively new term; in fact, it is an idea that grew out the colonial history of the Americas, where European-descended people invoked their own superiority to justify their domination over those with Native American or African ancestry, and where English people thought themselves superior to Irish or Spanish people. This course traces that history in the places that became part of the United States and examines British-American and US history in comparison to French- and Spanish-American history from the 1600s to the 1880s.

Wolf M/W 9:30-10:45
Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-C Arts and Humanities
SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM), Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

HIST 466 History of People of Color in the U.S.

History of the U.S. people of color, their experience in the development of American society, from the 1600s to present. Consequences of domination and racism in thwarting economic interests, and responses to limiting institutional arrangements. 

Tan, TH, 4:00- 6:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: US History. UD-D Social Sciences, American Ethnic and Racial Minorities, Social Justice

History 468 Women in the US from 1890 to the present

Gender has played a huge role in the 2016 presidential campaign.  Travel with us through the 20th century U.S. to explore the roots of today's debates regarding gender, feminism, and sexuality.  Learn about the New Women of the early 20th century who ventured into public spaces, secured the vote, and fought for birth control.  Follow diverse feminist movements across the rest of the century and explore the connections between feminism and unionization, civil rights, and gay liberation.  Explore, too, the powerful currents of resistance to changes in women's (and men's) roles. 

Katz, T/TH, 2:00- 3:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Science

SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

History 470 US Constitution to 1877 

History 470 surveys U.S. Constitutional history from its roots in England through the Reconstruction period. The emphasis is on the work of historians: analysis of original documents and writing about those data.  Students will examine primary source documents, write two out-of-class essays and complete three in-class essay exams.

Stein, T/TH, 9:30 – 10:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government

SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 471 US Constitution since 1877

In the summer of 2016, Muslim American Khizr Khan, the father of a U.S. soldier who had died in Afghanistan, famously asked Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump if he had even read the U.S. Constitution. In this class, students read the Constitution and study its history from the late nineteenth century to the present. We focus in particular on debates and discussions about the rights of immigrants, indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, poor people, racial minorities, sexual and gender minorities, women, and workers

Englander, T, 4:00-6:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government

SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

HIST 474 History of Labor in the United States

What does it mean to be an American worker?  How have working people in the United States reacted to this nation's evolution from a land of farmers into a prominent industrial power?  In what ways have workers shaped this transformation?  Students will consider these questions by following America's ever-changing working class through time, and by examining workers' institutional and non-institutional responses to the problems they have faced in life and labor.  We will address the impact of changing work processes on laboring men and women, as well as the influence of multiple allegiances of class, gender, race and ethnicity in shaping the various ideologies, social movements, labor unions and political parties spawned or supported by the workers in the United States.

Leikin, TH, 4:00- 6:45

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 475 Sexuality in the US Before 1900

Examination of the history of sexuality in colonial America and the United States before 1900, with emphasis on the sexual dimensions of capitalism, colonialism, conquest, immigration, imperialism, industrialization, racism, slavery, segregation, and urbanization. Same-sex, cross-sex, monoracial, and interracial relationships will be explored, as will courtship, marriage, and family life; abortion, birth control, fertility, and reproduction; sex work and commercialized sex; free love, monogamy, and polygamy; obscenity, pornography, and sexual representation; sexual health, disease, ability, and disability; sex education and sexual knowledge; sexual consent and violence; and the regulation and production of sexuality in society, culture, economy, politics, and law.

Stein, T/TH, 12:30- 1:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: Social Justice and American Institutions: US History

History 484 Disability and Culture in American

Examination of some of the major topics in U.S. history (industrialization, Civil War, eugenics, immigration, Great Depression, social policies, etc.) through the lens of "disability."

Fulfills the following GE requirement:UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, U.S. History

SF Studies: Social Justice

Kudlick, T/TH, 9:30- 10:45

History 500 Colonial Latin America

This course prompts students to understand the experiences created by the Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule in the Americas.  Students are encouraged to explore the lives and political behaviors of the African-American, European-American, indigenous, and mestizo “peoples that formed societies in colonial Latin American by chance and by design” between 1492 and 1823.  Special consideration is also given to the legacy of Spanish America in the formation of the United States

Morrison M/W 12:30-1:45

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Latin America

History 535 History of Women in Latin America

Latin American gender relations defy simple explanations. While the U.S. has yet to elect a female president, Latin Americans have elected several. At the same time machismo is often invoked to explain the absence of women from important sites of social power. In the course, we will explore the lives of women in several social categories, from the famous to the everyday. We will also analyze how the region’s various notions of femininity and female power have changed over time.

Morrison, M/W, 3:30- 4:45

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Latin America

History 570 Imperial China

Do you believe that China was the first country on earth to enter modernity? Do you know that humor can be a subject of serious historical study? The purpose of this course is to journey through Imperial China from 900 to 1700 to investigate the disappearance of the aristocracy, the construction of state bureaucracy, the evolution of the ethical teaching of Neo-Confucianism, the integration of China into world economy, the onslaught of “barbarian” rules, the interactions with Southeast Asia, Japan, and the West, the changing gender relations, and the rise of vernacular literature (including jokes). So buckle up!

Hsu T/TH, 9:30- 10:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: China or Asia

History 575 History of Women in China and Japan

Once upon a time, Chinese women bound their daughters’ feet and Japanese women walked three steps behind their husbands, but there is more to it than women’s oppression. The purpose of this course is to study the social, cultural, political, economic, and gender histories of women in China and Japan from the early modern to the contemporary times. Earlier history will also be referred to when relevant. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to the issues of constraint and fulfillment, discourse and reality, and look at the changing faces of Chinese and Japanese women in both the private and the public domains.

Hsu, T/TH, 2:00- 3:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences, Global perspectives, Social Justice

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia

History 582 Tales From Ancient India: Hinduism and Buddhism

This is a class on classical India through the Mahabharata. It's a real enjoyable reading, almost like reading Harry Potter (at least that's what the students said).  Mahabharata is the key to understanding Buddhism and Hinduism. Students who have an interest in the classics (Greek or Chinese or Islamic) will most definitely enjoy this course.

Chekuri T/TH, 11:00- 12:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Religion and Society, India or Asia

History 585 India since Gandhi

India/South Asia is home to more than one-fourth of the world’s population and to the some of the most diverse ethnicities, languages, religions, and political philosophies. It is home to the largest and most diverse Muslim and Hindu populations in the world.  It is home to more languages than Europe. It is simultaneously home to the largest democracy in the world (US is second!), and the largest military with nuclear arms-and has a history of intense conflicts.

This course will examine the everyday lives of ordinary people in India through memoir, biography, and journalism. In the course of the semester, you will gain an understanding of subaltern lives—of gender, caste, and class—in Indian society. Through a closer examination of these individuals living at the outermost edges of society, we will gain an understanding of an India that is struggling to keep up with the impact of economic globalization and social hierarchy.

Chekuri T/TH, 12:30- 1:45
Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: India or Asia

HIST 586 Bollywood and Beyond: Indian History Through Film

Examination of Indian history since 1947 through Indian film. Introduction to modern Indian culture and society. Examination of films produced in each of the decades since 1947 to explore the changing political and social dynamics of India. The stories that are told through film capture everything from the dreams, desires, and fantasies of Indians to their complex political and social locations in an ever-changing society.

Chekuri, TH, 4:00- 6:45

History 588 History of Southeast Asia

Join us for a voyage to Southeast Asia, one of the most diverse and interesting regions in the world.  We’ll explore the cultural, political, and social histories of societies from Burma to Vietnam to the Philippines.  And you’ll learn about how this area became a global crossroads where local practices have mixed with Chinese, Indian, European, and American influences.

Elkind M/W 11:00- 12:15
History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia

History 605 Islamic World II:  1500 to the Present

This course is a study of Islamic civilization (the Middle East), history, and culture from the 1700 to the present.  It focuses on a core region (the area between Nile and Oxus rivers).  Topics for the first part of the course include politics and society in the 18th and 19th centuries, the impact of European imperialism on the region's economy and culture, the response of regional (especially Ottoman) reform movements.  Topics for the second half of the course include the transformation of empires into nation-states, the rise of Arab nationalism, Arab-Israeli conflict, and the history of Iran, particularly its two 20th century revolutions.  The course also seeks to explain the rise of political Islam in light of its historical context. 

Behrooz, W, 4:00- 6:45

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia or Middle East

History 606 History of Iran and Afghanistan 1500 to Present

This course is a historical study of Iran and Afghanistan from the rise of the Safavid Empire in 1501 C.E. to the present.  The course begins with a historical background on the Iranian and Perso-Islamic cultural presence in the eastern half of the Islamic world and the geographic area known as Iranian plateau.  Then, the Safavid Empire's history and rise of Shi’ism in the region plus Safavid politics and society will be examined.  Next, Iran in the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries and the birth of Afghanistan as a separate entity will be covered.  Here Iranian and Afghan societies will be examined in light of disruption, colonial subjugation, reform and rebellion under the Afshars, the Zands and the Qajars and Dorrani shah’s in Afghanistan.  The final part of the course will examine Iran and Afghanistan in the twentieth century.  Subjects such as the two Iranian revolutions in the twentieth century, the Oil Nationalization Movement, the Iranian Communist movement and the rise of political Islam as well as Afghanistan’s reforms, Soviet invasion, civil war and the rise of Taliban will be the main focus of this part.

Behrooz  M/W 2:00-3:15

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Middle East

History 611 Modern Africa

This upper division course covers the history of Africa during the period since 1750 CE, focusing primarily on the Sub-Saharan regions.  Through traditional lectures, videos, dialogues with the guest speakers, and discussions of primary sources, the class will explore African societies and their histories in depth.  The course will commence with the last, catastrophic decade of the African slave trades; the confrontation of Boer and Bantu in southern Africa; and the expansion of Islamic states in North, West, and Central Africa.  The period of European colonial rule in Africa will be treated in considerable detail, as will Africa's place in the larger world of Diaspora of its peoples.  During much of the semester, however, our focus will be on African movements for independence, and on the struggles to build new, free states in a global system still dominated by the West.  Reading, research, attendance, and writing will be emphasized in this course.  There also will be a project, during the second half of the semester, which will require you to work with other students outside of class meeting times.  This class satisfies Segment III requirements.

T/TH, 2:00- 3:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences, Global Perspectives

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Africa

HIST 612 Gender in African History

Development of competencies around the theme of gender in the African past by working with a variety of texts and sources and the scholarship of leading researchers in this field.

T, 4:00- 6:45

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences, Global Perspectives

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Africa

History 620 Pirates and Piracy

This course surveys the development and nature of pirates and piracy from
ancient to modern times. No band of outlaws has so caught our imagination as pirates.
Swashbucklers and buccaneers abound in popular culture as the nature of pirates has been
increasingly romanticized. Just how accurate are these modern depictions of pirates? In this class
we will explore the historical reality of pirates and piracy through the ages, from ancient Greece
and Rome to modern days. Who were pirates and how were they seen and depicted by
contemporary peoples? How was piracy dealt with? Actual first hand sources concerning pirates
and the fight against them will be utilized throughout the class.

Campbell, M/W, 12:30- 1:45

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe Pre-1500, Europe Post-1500, Asia, Africa

PROSEMINARS (HIST 640/642/644)

Prerequisite requirement for all Proseminars is the successful completion of History 300 GWAR with a grade of “C” or better.

History 640 European History: World War I: Social and Cultural Perspectives

In August 1914, the great powers of Europe started a war that was supposed to be over by Christmas.  By Armistice Day in November 1918, nine million Europeans were dead, and twenty-two million returned home with wounds in body or mind.   Millions of others, including women, had been mobilized in war work at home.  Almost everybody lost a loved one.  How did such a catastrophic war affect European society and culture?  In this seminar, we will explore how European society was turned upside down during the "Great War" from 1914 to 1918 and in its immediate aftermath. Using primary documents, memoirs, fiction, poetry, art, film footage, images, and historical studies, we will examine such issues as the trauma of trench warfare, shell shock, the home front, the propaganda used to promote the war, objectors to the war, strikes and worker discontent, women's roles and gender anxieties, the "lost generation," and the construction of memory after the war. This seminar is not intended to be a diplomatic or military history of World War I, but rather an exploration of the societal and cultural transformations that accompanied the strains of Europe's first total war.

Curtis, T, 4:00- 6:45

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe Post-1500

History 640 European History: Globalization

This is a course for History majors, designed as a culminating experience.  The topic is the latest period of world history, usually called the period of Globalization, from its origins, as I see it, in the revolutionary events of 1968 to the world financial crash of 2008.  Our focus is world politics, the interplay of the great powers in war and peace, recognizing that this is a revolutionary period in the economic, social, and intellectual life of the world’s peoples. We try to see the economic and political changes of the period in terms of ideas.  We have to consider the unraveling of capitalism and the end of stable currencies based on gold, the fall of Soviet Communism, the crisis of Third World ideology based on freedom from dependence, the rise of world finance and its ideology of globalism, and finally its collapse in the crash of 2008.  We are trying to make sense of it all as world history and also trying to bring our different perspectives to bear on the task.  Texts may include Bremmer, The End of the Free Market; McNally, Global Slump, Lacqueur, Putinism; Hiro, After Empire.   

D’Agostino, T/TH, 2:00- 3:15

Hist 642: “America’s America”: California and the West

Does the story of California and the West reveal what America is, or does it tell us what America isn’t? This proseminar will introduce students to some of the latest and most groundbreaking scholarship exploring these big questions. The course will also provide hands-on training in historical research and writing. Over the semester, students will submit weekly reading responses, short paper draft assignments, a peer review, and a 15 - 20 page final paper on a topic chosen within the history of California and the American

Viator, M/W, 2:00- 3:15

History 642 American History: US Conservatism

Description Pending

Postel, TH, 4:00- 6:45

HIST 660 Computer Methodology for Historians

 This course introduces students to the ways that historians currently use computers for teaching, research, and communications.  It offers valuable skills that may be used both during one's academic career and on many jobs both within the field of history and the broader world.  Among the topics covered are: e-mail, searching the world wide web, creating

M/W, 11:00- 12:15

History 699 Social Serendipity: How Individuals Spark Change in America*

*Please note, this is a single unit course offered by the Experimantel College

A case study based course where we analyze individuals throughout history to understand how they utilized their social location in order to create change within a community they identify with. Specifically, how their actions impacted the greater society at large. In this course, we will look at individuals who sparked revolutionary change across different divisions of society including: religion, politics, gender/sexuality, business, and art/literature. Students will be able to recognize themselves as contemporary agents of change. Collectively, this course aims to reimagine history as the culmination of everyday people who inspired a domino effect for reform.

Days and Time TBD. For inquiries contact Analisa Spina at aspina@mail.sfsu.edu. All students are welcome regardless of class level.