Spring 2017 Course Catalog

History 101  Critical Thinking, History, and Zombies

*New Course!*

Throughout the twentieth century, zombies have been one of our favorite scares. From films like Victor Halperin’s 1932 White Zombie to Marc Forster’s 2013 World War Z, from video games like Resident Evil to comic books like The Walking Dead, we have been fascinated by the reanimated dead. In many ways, what scares us tells us a lot about who we are. This class will ask the questions, “Why are we so frightened by zombies?” and “What does our fear of zombies tell us about ourselves?” We will look for answers in films, books, and other media, thinking critically about them and examining them primarily through the lenses of race, capitalism, and public health. 

  • Dr. Lisy-Wagner  T/TH 12:35-1:50
  • Fulfills GE A3- Critical Thinking Requirement
  • SF Studies SJ (Social Justice)

History 110 Western Civilization to 1500CE

It all starts here. The basis for what defines western culture, including politics, religion, science, and cuisine, begins to coalesce before 1500CE. From Mesopotamia to the Italian City-States of the Renaissance, we will be looking at how the western world defined itself and understood others, sometimes through appropriation, and sometimes through cooperation. 

  • Dr. Pafford T/TH 12:35-1:50
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  C2-Lower Division,
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

History 114 World History to 1500CE

This class will examine humanities first agricultural endeavors to the first great world empires of the Classical period, to the introduction of Islam on the world stage. Developments in every aspect of the human experience are contextualized and explored using a global perspective to explore the foundations of science, politics, law, and artistic expression.  

  • Professor Arrieta MWF 1:10-2:00 or MWF 10:10-11:00
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

History 115 World History since 1500CE

The study of World History allows us to see how globalization took shape, how something as simple as a trade route also brought advances in technology, cultural exchange and understanding, the machines of war, and new religious and spiritual belief systems. Looking at our world beyond the “New World” and “Old World” paradigm allows us to see the depth and richness of the human experience, and to connect with cultures and our own past.

  • Professor Arrieta MWF 12:10-1:00
  • Dr. Chekuri T/TH 2:10-3:25
  • Dr. Behrooz  MW 11:10-12:25
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

History 120 US History to Reconstruction

The struggle is real! Learn how Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans vied for power in the "New World" and how gender, race, and wealth affected the social, cultural, and political development of America from the colonial period to the American Revolution, the Civil War, Native settlement and conquest, and Reconstruction.

  • Dr. Englander T/TH 11:10-1225 or   TH 410-655
  • Dr. Wolf MW 9:35-10:50
  • Dr. Sigmon MWF 11:10-12:00
  • Dr. Leikin T/TH 2:10-3:25
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • Requirement for the History Major

History 121 US History since reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

  • Dr. Leikin T/TH 9:35-10:50 or T/TH 11:10-12:25 or TH 4:10-6:55
  • Dr. Dollinger TH 4:10-6:55
  • Professor Arrieta MWF 9:10-10:00 or W 4:10-6:55
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History
  • SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
  • Requirement for the History Major

History 130 US History for FOREIGN STUDENTS

PREREQUISITE: Studied US History at a non-US high school.

This course covers the breadth of US History, starting with its European roots circa 1400-1600 CE and culminating with Roosevelt’s New Deal.   

  • Dr. Germany MWF 1:10-2:00 or MWF 3:10-4:00
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: D-2 Lower Division, AI American Institutions US History

This course will NOT count towards the history major, nor will it count towards GE requirements for students who do not meet the prerequisites.

History 300 GWAR

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of ENGLISH 214.

Are you interested in how historians uncover historical documents and figure out what they mean?  Do you want to know how and why historical interpretations change over time?  Then join History 300 to learn the nuts and bolts of history research, analysis and writing.  This is where you'll learn all the secrets about being a real historian.

  • Dr. Katz T/TH 11:10-12:25
  • Dr. Hsu M/W 12:30-1:45
  • Dr. Mabalon M/W 2:10-3:25
  • Dr. Harris T/TH 4:10-5:25
  • This course is required for all History Majors, who must pass with a C or better.  It cannot be taken CR/NC.
  • This course is the prerequisite for history Proseminars (HIST 640,642,644)

History 313  Comparative History of Love and Sexuality

Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it… Is it that simple? Do we all approach love and sex in the same way? This course will look at documents about love and sex in a variety of contexts – from different times, in different places, by a variety of people. We will be looking at a diversity of sources in order to examine what might be shared about this experience and what might be different in different contexts. Topics will include love and courtship, unions, sexual identity, prostitution, and pornography.

  • Dr. Lisy-Wagner TH 4:10-6:55
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP), Social Justice (SJ)
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  US, World, Europe pre 1500, Europe after 1500, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

History 315 History of Science from the Scientific Revolution to the Present

*New Course!*

Europeans’ discovery of the Americas (which had, of course, long been known to indigenous Americans!), provided an epistemological shock to intellectuals throughout Europe. The Greek and Roman thinkers which provided the basis for Renaissance knowledge had not known about the Americas, had not even guessed at them. Over the course of the early modern period, experience became the most important source of knowledge, rather than ancient texts. The foundations of modern science were laid on this new and growing emphasis on experience and experiments as the sites of knowledge production. As industrialization began to take hold, the development of science and technology escalated. People began to understand their universe in ways incomprehensible to the natural philosophers of the early modern period, and with modern technologies began to exploit their world’s natural resources on an unprecedented scale. This course will start with what historians have (perhaps problematically) called the Scientific Revolution and follow the story through to the present day. The narrative will largely focus on scientific developments in Europe and the United States, but will strive to incorporate connections with Africa, Asia, and Latin America and to respect the scientific traditions in those regions. The course will also look at the symbiotic relationship between people and the environment, focusing both on the ways that humans impact their environment and the ways that the natural world impacts human events.

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies Environmental Sustainability (ES) and Global Perspectives (GP)
  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  US, World, or Europe after 1500
  • Dr. Lisy-Wagner T/TH 9:35-10:50

History 317  Holocaust & Genocide

Process and conditions which led to the harassment, expulsion, and extermination of the Jews during World War II; new information about the concentration camp system. 

  • Dr. Millet T/TH 9:35-10:50
  • History Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500

History 321 Hellenistic Greece

This course will explore the developments in the Mediterranean World from the rise of Alexander the Great until the Roman conquest (c. 350s – 30 BC). We will examine Alexander as both conqueror and destructor, and we will see what his successors did with his lands. This class is filled with political intrigue, brilliant maneuvers and amazingly poor decisions, heroic (and not so heroic) kings and righteous (and not so righteous) rebels, and a host of other topics..  

  • Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500
  • Dr. Campbell T/TH 9:35-10:50

History 322 The Roman Republic

This course covers the rise of the Romans from prehistory to the fall of the Republic with the assassination of Julius Caesar.  We will see the fascinating development of Rome, from a small city on the edge of Latium to a major empire that controlled virtually the entire Mediterranean region. We will also explore how the Roman identity developed and how it shaped the history of the Roman Republic. We will also use primary sources to examine both Roman culture (the poems of Catullus) and their understanding of history (the historical works of Sallust). 

  • Dr. Campbell T/TH 12:35-1:50
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe before 1500, or History of Empires

History 347 Women in Modern Europe

“I read it [history] a little as a duty; but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me.  The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all, it is very tiresome” (Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey).   This course is not tiresome at all: learn about extraordinary and ordinary European women from the eighteenth century to the present through fiction, memoirs, and manifestos as well as individual research projects.  In addition to restoring women's voices to history, we will examine well-known historical events from the perspective of women's history, look at ideas about women, and examine the historical roots of issues and debates still informing the lives of European women.  Until we reach the twentieth century, we will be looking exclusively at Britain and France; after World War I, we will also consider women’s experiences in Russia, Germany, and (to a lesser extent) Italy and Spain.

  • Dr. Curtis T/Th 11:10-12:25
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  UD-C Arts and Humanities
  • SF Studies:  Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

History 349 Medieval Popular Beliefs

What do you get when you mix saints, vampires, ghosts, angels, and demons and add a dash of piety, ritual, and inquisition? The world's weirdest recipe?  A really bad novel? A political campaign? We are not sure either, but if you take Medieval Popular Beliefs you will learn how these things ingrained themselves into the medieval imagination and shaped how the people in the Middle Ages saw and understood the world around them.

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe before 1500
  • Dr. Rodriguez M/W 2:10-3:25

History 386 Soviets, the West, and the Cold War

At center stage is the nuclear arms race and the ideological and political confrontation between the two superpowers.  We want to try to understand how their cooperation against the fascists in World War Two was transformed into a hostile standoff in the center of Europe that threatened the incineration of the planet.  We trace this problem up to the fall of Soviet Communism in the Gorbachev reforms. 

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500
  • Dr. D’agostino T/TH 12:30-1:45

History 418 Society and Politics in US History

Rebels, Resisters and Reformers. This course will examine several instances of rebellion, resistance and reform in American History. Subjects include Shay’s Rebellion, Slave resistance and rebellion, William Lloyd Garrison and the immediate abolitionists, the Knights of Labor, the formation of the CIO, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Feminist Movement. Each subject will be explored as a historiographical problem with in-depth reading of a variety of historians.

  • Dr. Leikin T 4:10-6:55
  • Fulfills the following GE requirement: American Institutions, US History
  • SF Studies : American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 421 Food Fight! The Politics of American Jewish Food Consumption

"You don't have to be Jewish to love Levy's Real Jewish Rye," the 1960s advertisement said. You don't have to be Jewish to love talking about American Jewish food, either. There may or may not be thematically appropriate snacks.

  • Dr. Gross T/TH 12:35-1:50
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US History

History 450 The History of California

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.” 

  • Dr. Dreyfus TH 4:10-6:55
  • Dr. Livie T 4:10-6:55
  • Dr. Sigmon M/W 2:10-3:25
  • Dr. Viator M/W 12:35-1:50
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, California State and Local Government
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 451 Bay Area History and Society  - ONLINE for Spring 2017

Exploration of the Bay Area, specifically San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Jose, from a sociohistorical and global perspective. Exploration of various dimensions of the bay area’s human and environmental composition and history, paying special attention to the built environment, immigration, globalization, race and class.

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US History
  • Dr. Haskaj ONLINE

History 465 American Ethnicity and Race Relations from 1890

  • Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, American Institutions, US History
  • SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US
  • Dr. Mabalon M/W 11:10-12:25

History 467 Women in the US to 1890 – ONLINE for Spring 2017

American women differ by race, class, ethnicity, age, culture, sexual orientation, and family situation.  Yet gender remains a significant category for historical study.  This course examines the histories of women in the United States from pre-Columbian times to 1890

  • Dr. Crabtree ONLINE
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

History 468 Women in the US from 1890 to the Present

Gender has played a huge role in the 2016 presidential campaign.  Travel with us through the 20th century U.S. to explore the roots of today's debates regarding gender, feminism, and sexuality.  Learn about the New Women of the early 20th century who ventured into public spaces, secured the vote, and fought for birth control.  Follow diverse feminist movements across the rest of the century and explore the connections between feminism and unionization, civil rights, and gay liberation.  Explore, too, the powerful currents of resistance to changes in women's (and men's) roles. 

  • Dr. Katz T/TH 2:10-3:25
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Science
  • SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

History 471 US Constitution since 1877

*This class fills quickly*

In the summer of 2016, Muslim American Khizr Khan, the father of a U.S. soldier who had died in Afghanistan, famously asked Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump if he had even read the U.S. Constitution. In this class, students read the Constitution and study its history from the late nineteenth century to the present. We focus in particular on debates and discussions about the rights of immigrants, indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, poor people, racial minorities, sexual and gender minorities, women, and workers

  • Dr. Stein T/TH 11:00-12:15
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government
  • SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US , Law, or Constitution

History 473 Unfree Labor in the Early US

What was American slavery like? How did it compare to other forms of bound labor such as servitude and apprenticeship? How did notions of race and gender shape the development of slavery, servitude, and apprenticeship? And how and why did "free labor"--meaning wage-based labor, or what some historians have referred to as capitalist labor relations--replace bound, "unfree" labor in the United States? We will work to answer these questions in this lecture-discussion course that covers the period from the 1600s to the Civil War.

  • Dr. Wolf MW 12:35-1:50
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 480 Thought and Culture in the US to 1880

*This class has not been taught since 2013 – don’t miss it!*

How Americans think today, and the cultural presentation of those thoughts, has deep roots in the country’s past. This course examines those roots and their material and ideological manifestations from the Colonial period to the 1890s. Social, political, religious, and philosophical thought will be considered along with developments in the arts, literature, popular entertainment, and behavior. Major thinkers in both elite circles and popular groups will be considered along with the intellectual, social, cultural and political movements of the marginalized. These individuals attempted to understand their world and convey their thoughts and personal experiences through artistic and philosophical self-expression. We will explore this journey of America, and self-understanding, keeping a keen eye on how the tendrils of those thoughts and culture are still with us today. 

  • Dr. Corea T/TH 11:10-12:25
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 484 Disability and Culture in the US

From freak shows to a federal building occupied thanks to the Black Panther Party, disabled people have shaped US history in ways large and small. Everything is up for grabs thanks to this new perspective on America’s past: slavery, immigration, veterans, women’s rights, even famous people like FDR and Helen Keller. 

  • Dr. Kudlick M/W 2:10-3:25
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Art and Humanities, American Institutions, US History
  • SF Studies Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following areas of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

History 490 History and Literature of Baseball

*This class fills quickly*

Come see how US History is reflected in our favorite pastime, and how changes in capitalism, race relations, technology and gender expectations have been reflected on the field of play.

  • Dr. Sigmon M 4:10-655
  • History majors may count this towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 490 History of Sexuality

This course explores change and continuity in the history of sexuality over the last several centuries. We examine cross-sex and same-sex sexualities; monoracial and interracial sex; abortion, birth control, fertility, marriage, reproduction, and sterilization; commercial sex, obscenity, pornography, prostitution, and sex work; sexual health and disease; sexual exploitation and violence; and sex and gender change.

  • Dr.Stein T/TH 2:10-3:25
  • History majors may count this towards the following areas of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

History 524 History of Mexico

In this course, students examine selected themes in Mexican politics, economics, and culture, from the Spanish conquest in 1521 to the present. The course focuses initially on the blending of Spanish and Indian civilizations, and the emergence of a Mexican identity from Mexico’s colonial period. Students then explore the process of nation-building after independence in the 19th century, and assess agrarian conflict and revolution in the 20th century. The state’s ascent as the dominant force in Mexican society, the peculiar nature of Mexico's "one-party democracy," and the exhaustion of such a system after the year 2000, are the main themes of the course’s second half.

  • Dr. Oñate T/TH 9:30-10:45
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: World or Latin American History

History 550 Social Changes in Modern Latin America

This course focuses on the economic, political, and cultural changes in Latin America’s societies since 1932, and delves into diverse interpretations of the transitions from authoritarian regimes, in the 1980s, to liberal democracies by the year 2000, in selected countries. Students explore, too, the roots of the continuing cycles of economic crisis, poverty, and social unrest, and the region’s prospects for democracy and sustainable economic development in the global markets of the 21st century.

  • Dr. Oñate T/TH 12:35-1:50
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: World or Latin American History

History 569 Ancient Chinese Civilization

Prepare to be amazed by the rich array of heroes and antiheroes in the historical drama of ancient China. This course traces the evolution of Chinese civilization from the Neolithic through the end of the Tang dynasty, around 900. We will study the origin of Chinese civilization; the lives and thoughts of sagacious Confucians, care-free Taoists, Spartan Mohists, and Machiavellian Legalists; the unification of China by the tyrannical yet accomplished First Emperor of Qin; the rises and falls of subsequent dynasties Han, Six Dynasties, Sui, and Tang; the flowering of Buddhism; the opening of the legendary trade route Silk Road; and the formation of Chinese social and cultural tradition.

  • Dr. Hsu M/W 9:35-10:50
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: World, China, or Asian History

History 575 History of Women in China and Japan

Once upon a time, Chinese women bound their daughters’ feet and Japanese women walked three steps behind their husbands, but there is more to it than women’s oppression. The purpose of this course is to study the social, cultural, political, economic, and gender histories of women in China and Japan from the early modern to the contemporary times. Earlier history will also be referred to when relevant. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to the issues of constraint and fulfillment, discourse and reality, and look at the changing faces of Chinese and Japanese women in both the private and the public domains.

  • Dr. Hsu W 4:10-6:55
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:   Gender, Sexuality, and the Body, World, China, or Asian History

History 584 India and the British Empire

This course is an introduction to important themes in the encounter between India and the British Empire. Britain ruled India for nearly 200 years and influences of that history continue to be felt in both places to this day. In the course of the semester, we will examine how the encounter defined England and India as well as the regions of the Indian Ocean from the Middle East and Africa to Southeast Asia and Australia. We will look at how India came to be reordered under British rule and our main focus will be on the period from 1800 onwards. The readings will provide you a sampling of important cultural and political writings. While the study of the British Empire is a much larger discipline, this course will be limited to the period of British rule in India primarily. This course will also introduce you to some exciting themes, concepts and debates in the study of Indian history. The course is based on a combination of lectures, discussions, and student presentations. I expect students to take an active part in engaging the course readings as well as in class discussions. 

  • Dr. Chekuri T/TH 11:10-12:25
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP), Social Justice (SJ)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: World, Asia, India, or Empire

History 605 Islamic World II:  1500 to the Present

This course is a study of Islamic civilization (the Middle East), history, and culture from the 1700 to the present.  It focuses on a core region (the area between Nile and Oxus rivers).  Topics for the first part of the course include politics and society in the 18th and 19th centuries, the impact of European imperialism on the region's economy and culture, the response of regional (especially Ottoman) reform movements.  Topics for the second half of the course include the transformation of empires into nation-states, the rise of Arab nationalism, Arab-Israeli conflict, and the history of Iran, particularly its two 20th century revolutions.  The course also seeks to explain the rise of political Islam in light of its historical context. 

  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:  World , Asia, Religion, or Middle East
  • Dr. Behrooz M 4:10-6:55

History 607 Recent Near East History

This course is a study of imperialism and colonialism in the Near East (West Asia and North Africa) in the 20th and early 21st centuries.  Students are expected to have a general background on the region’s history, peoples and religions.  The course opens with an overview of reform and reaction in the region to key global developments such as modernity, revolution and industrialization in the West, and colonialism in the 19th century.  The first part of the course is devoted to a study of WWI and its aftermath in light of the fall of the Ottoman Empire and its consequences.  Here, emergence of Zionism, early stages of Arab nationalism, and the emergence of modern Turkish republicanism and Iranian nationalism will be carefully studied.  Next, the status and early development of Islamist ideology (political Islam) and communism as viable alternatives to secular nationalism will be studies.  The second part of the course will be devoted to examining reform and reaction after WWII and in light of the cold war, establishment of the state of Israel, fall of communism and weakening of secular nationalist discourse. 

  • Dr. Behrooz MW 2:10-3:25
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:  World,  Asia , Religion, or Middle East

History 609 Approaches to the African Past

Working with language, physical evidence, images, oral testimony, and texts, we  explore themes including the peopling of the continent, the construction of enduring societies, the experiences of colonialism and apartheid, the struggle for independence, and the quest for reconciliation and healing. 

  • Dr. Morrison M/W 12:35-1:50
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP),
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:  World or Africa

History 619 Reacting to Revolution

*New Course*

This is a course in the practical politics of revolution—balancing ideas and realties—in historical settings. It puts you face-to-face with the challenges of digesting a revolution and constructing the framework for a new nation (as well as developing your critical thinking and communications skills). Using the ‘historical games’ model of the “Reacting to the Past” program, you will re-enact both the American Constitutional Convention of 1787 and the French National Assembly of 1791-92, presenting and resolving arguments on crucial political and constitutional issues.

  • Dr. Harris T/TH 2:10-3:25
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, Law, Constitution, or Europe after 1500

History 632 Jewish History:  the Beginning to 1650

Jewish history from the sixth century B.C.E. to the rise of European modernity. Politics, culture, and religion under empires of Persia, Hellenism, and Rome, and in medieval diasporas of Europe and lands of Islam.

  • Dr. Astren M/W 2:10-3:25
  • Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
  • SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:  World, Middle East, or Europe before 1500

History 640 PROSEMINAR: World War I Social and Cultural Perspectives

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

In August 1914, the great powers of Europe started a war that was supposed to be over by Christmas.  By Armistice Day in November 1918, nine million Europeans were dead, and twenty-two million returned home with wounds in body or mind.   Millions of others, including women, had been mobilized in war work at home.  Almost everybody lost a loved one.  How did such a catastrophic war affect European society and culture?  In this seminar, we will explore how European society was turned upside down during the "Great War" from 1914 to 1918 and in its immediate aftermath. Using primary documents, memoirs, fiction, poetry, art, film footage, images, and historical studies, we will examine such issues as the trauma of trench warfare, shell shock, the home front, the propaganda used to promote the war, objectors to the war, strikes and worker discontent, women's roles and gender anxieties, the "lost generation," and the construction of memory after the war. This seminar is not intended to be a diplomatic or military history of World War I, but rather an exploration of the societal and cultural transformations that accompanied the strains of Europe's first total war.

  • Dr. Curtis T/TH 2:10-3:25
  • All history majors must complete a Proseminar with a grade of “C” or better. This course may not be taken CR/NC.
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500, Africa, or Asia

History 642 PROSEMINAR:  Historical Perspectives on Food, Culture and Identity

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

What do SPAM, spaghetti and meatballs, burritos, chop suey and barbecue tell us about American history? This class explores how food can tell us about who we are and who we yearn to become as Americans. Learn about the role of sugar in slavery, the role of home economics and domestic science in imperialism overseas and in brutal American Indian assimilation projects, the impact of suburbanization and the Cold War on American diets (backyard barbecues!) and more. Learn how what we ate in the United States from the nation's founding to the 21st century was based on indigenous cultures, enslaved peoples and diverse immigrants bringing their dreams and cravings to the United States. Students will study primary sources such as recipes, commercials, and cookbooks and read secondary sources on the history of food in the United States, then write a research paper on an aspect of food history in the United States.

  • Dr. Mabalon M 4:10-6:55
  • All history majors must complete a Proseminar with a grade of “C” or better. This course may not be taken CR/NC.
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 642 PROSEMINAR North vs South

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

How united was the United States in the period from the American Revolution to the eve of the Civil War? How did the division into slave and free states affect national politics, culture, and identity? Did being American mean something different in the North versus in the South? In this proseminar we will read books and articles that address these questions, and students will pick a locality to study, using primary-source research, in order to understand the relationship between sectional and national identity in the United States from 1788-1860.

  • Dr. Wolf M 4:10-6:55
  • All history majors must complete a Proseminar with a grade of “C” or better. This course may not be taken CR/NC.
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 642 PROSEMINAR Silicon Valley

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

Technology drives more than innovation, it shapes immigration policy, culture, economics, and ecology. The Silicon Valley powers how we connect personally and globally. How do we as historians and social scientists understand this technology? Are the utopian understandings of digital technology justified? How do we understand the transformation of knowledge and information from the traditional libraries and archives to digital formats? And finally what happens to the national boundaries and politics in the age of information technology flows? We will not focus on the particular technology aspects. We ask questions about the role of technology in our lives, impact on the economy, the region, and consequences for our collective futures. 

  • Dr. Chekuri T 4:10-6:55
  • All history majors must complete a Proseminar with a grade of “C” or better. This course may not be taken CR/NC.
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, Europe after 1500, World

History 644 PROSEMINAR Black Atlantic

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

This course will explore how the connectivity of diverse cultures gave rise to something new and unique – the Black Atlantic. After a brief overview, four biographies of black individuals negotiating their inclusion respectively into Cuba, Brazil, the U.S. and Nigeria will be used to examine commonalities and differences of Black Atlantic experiences across place and time. These case studies range in time from the middle of the nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth century.

  • Dr. Morrison M/W 9:35-10:50
  • All history majors must complete a Proseminar with a grade of “C” or better. This course may not be taken CR/NC.
  • History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, Europe after 1500, World, Africa, Latin America