Summer 18

History 110 Western Civilization to 1500CE
It all starts here. The basis for what defines western culture, including politics, religion, science, and cuisine, begins to coalesce before 1500CE. From Mesopotamia to the Italian City-States of the Renaissance, we will be looking at how the western world defined itself and understood others, sometimes through appropriation, and sometimes through cooperation.

Rodriguez- RD1, T/Th, 9:00-1:00
Fulfills the following GE requirements:  C2-Lower Division,
SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

 
History 114 World History to 1500CE

This class will examine humanities first agricultural endeavors to the first great world empires of the Classical period, to the introduction of Islam on the world stage. Developments in every aspect of the human experience are contextualized and explored using a global perspective to explore the foundations of science, politics, law, and artistic expression.Arrieta-

RD1, T/Th, 9:00-1:00

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,
SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

 
History 115 World History since 1500CE

 The study of World History allows us to see how globalization took shape, how something as simple as a trade route also brought advances in technology, cultural exchange and understanding, the machines of war, and new religious and spiritual belief systems. Looking at our world beyond the “New World” and “Old World” paradigm allows us to see the depth and richness of the human experience, and to connect with cultures and our own past.

Morrison- RD3, M./W., 1:15- 5:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,
SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

 

History 120 US History to Reconstruction

The struggle is real! Learn how Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans vied for power in the "New World" and how gender, race, and wealth affected the social, cultural, and political development of America from the colonial period to the American Revolution, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

Sigmon- RD3, M./W., 9:00-1:00

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History
SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
Requirement for the History Major

History 121 US History Since Reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Arrieta- R1, T./TH., 1:15-5:00
Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History
SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)
Requirement for the History Major

 

History 313  Comparative History of Love and Sexuality

Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it… Is it that simple? Do we all approach love and sex in the same way? This course will look at documents about love and sex in a variety of contexts – from different times, in different places, by a variety of people. We will be looking at a diversity of sources in order to examine what might be shared about this experience and what might be different in different contexts. Topics will include love and courtship, unions, sexual identity, prostitution, and pornography.

LIsy-Wagner- R1, M./W., 1:15- 5:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities

SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP), Social Justice (SJ)

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  US,  Europe pre 1500, Europe after 1500, Asia, Middle East, Latin America, Africa, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

 

History 320 Archaic and Classical Greece

Democracy, philosophy, togas – these are some of the hallmarks of ancient Greece. But these are only a part of what made early Greek society unique. In this class, we will explore ancient Greece from the early Mycenaean kingdoms and their collapse to the resurgence of Greek power in the Archaic and Classical periods. The Greeks arose as a distant people in an already ancient world, both learning from and challenging older more established powers. Greek cultural and political developments resulted in a formidable people who alone could stand up to the power of the mighty Persian Empire. Their potential was only limited by their inability to work together – a fractiousness that resulted in civil war. In this class, we will look at the political and social developments of the Greeks from their earliest historical period to the end of the Peloponnesian War, which ushered in the era of Alexander the Great. Numerous primary sources will be used to explore the ancient Greeks and how they saw themselves and the world that they inhabited.

Campbell- T./TH., 1:15-5:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500

 

History 334 The Renaissance

What do you get when you cross unending warfare, catastrophic plagues, decaying institutions, and great art? Why, the Renaissance, of course. If that's not enough to interest you, we also have witches,\ religious upheaval, conflicted humanists, lost explorers, and nobles who accidentally set themselves on fire.

Rodriguez- RD1, T./TH., 1:15-5:15

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500 and Europe after 1500

 

History 450 The History of California

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.” 

Sigmon- M.W., 1:15-5:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, California State and Local Government, UD-D: Social Sciences

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

History 620 Pirates and Piracy

This course surveys the development and nature of pirates and piracy from
ancient to modern times. No band of outlaws has so caught our imagination as pirates.
Swashbucklers and buccaneers abound in popular culture as the nature of pirates has been
increasingly romanticized. Just how accurate are these modern depictions of pirates? In this class
we will explore the historical reality of pirates and piracy through the ages, from ancient Greece
and Rome to modern days. Who were pirates and how were they seen and depicted by
contemporary peoples? How was piracy dealt with? Actual first hand sources concerning pirates
and the fight against them will be utilized throughout the class.

Campbell- R3, T.TH., 9:00-1:00