Spring 2018

HIST 101 Critical Thinking: Critical Thinking, History, and Zombies   FULL

Throughout the twentieth century, zombies have been one of our favorite scares. From films like Victor Halperin’s 1932 White Zombie to Marc Forster’s 2013 World War Z, from video games like Resident Evil to comic books like The Walking Dead, we have been fascinated by the reanimated dead. In many ways, what scares us tells us a lot about who we are. This class will ask the questions, “Why are we so frightened by zombies?” and “What does our fear of zombies tell us about ourselves?” We will look for answers in films, books, and other media, thinking critically about them and examining them primarily through the lenses of race, capitalism, and public health.

Dr. Lisy-Wagner M/W 12:35 – 1:50

Fulfills GE A3- Critical Thinking Requirement

SF Studies SJ (Social Justice)
 

HIST 101 Critical Thinking: Democracy FULL

What did Socrates say about democracy? What did Nelson Mandela say?

What would you say if you were talking to them and their colleagues?

We will find out, because in this course we will be using two historical re-enactment game—Athens 403BC and South Africa 1993—to explore the changing nature of democracy. In each game, each of you will be assigned a specific role informed by real historical events and the ideas of important thinkers and political leaders. You will critically analyze those events and ideas; then argue, write, negotiate, and, hopefully, resolve the pressing issues of the day.

We start with some preliminary workshops on history, critical thinking, and public speaking, and spend some time getting grounded in each game’s situation, but much of the time we be ‘in the game.’ It’s a lot more fun, rewarding, and challenging than sitting taking notes all the time.

This is the first time this way of doing history has been available to SFSU Freshmen.

Dr. Harris T/TH 2:10 – 3:25

Fulfills GE A3- Critical Thinking Requirement

SF Studies SJ (Social Justice)
 

History 114 World History to 1500CE

This class will examine humanities first agricultural endeavors to the first great world empires of the Classical period, to the introduction of Islam on the world stage. Developments in every aspect of the human experience are contextualized and explored using a global perspective to explore the foundations of science, politics, law, and artistic expression. 

Hsu, T/TH, 12:35- 1:50

Dr. Campbell T/TH 9:35 – 10:50

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major
 

History 115 World History since 1500CE

The study of World History allows us to see how globalization took shape, how something as simple as a trade route also brought advances in technology, cultural exchange and understanding, the machines of war, and new religious and spiritual belief systems. Looking at our world beyond the “New World” and “Old World” paradigm allows us to see the depth and richness of the human experience, and to connect with cultures and our own past.

Professor Arrieta M/W/F 12:10 – 1:00

Dr. Behrooz M/W 2:10 – 3:25

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

 

History 120 US History to Reconstruction

The struggle is real! Learn how Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans vied for power in the "New World" and how gender, race, and wealth affected the social, cultural, and political development of America from the colonial period to the American Revolution, the Civil War, Native settlement and conquest, and Reconstruction.

Dr. Germany M/W/F 3:10- 4:00

Dr. Leikin T/TH 11:10 – 12:25 (Full) or 2:10 – 3:25 

Arrieta, M/W/F, 10:10- 11:00 (Full)

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

 

Requirement for the History Major

 

History 121 US History since Reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Leikin, T/TH, 9:35 – 10:50

Dollinger, T, 4:10 – 6:55

Arrieta, M/W/F, 9:10 – 10:00 (Full)

Arrieta, W, 4:10 – 6:55 (Full)

Viator, M/W/F, 3:10 -4:00

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

 

Requirement for the History Major

 

History 130 US History for FOREIGN STUDENTS

PREREQUISITE: Studied US History at a non-US high school.

This course covers the breadth of US History, starting with its European roots circa 1400-1600 CE and culminating with Roosevelt’s New Deal.  

Dr. Germany, M/W/F 11:10 – 12:00 OR 1:10-2:00

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D-2 Lower Division, AI American Institutions US History

This course will NOT count towards the history major, nor will it count towards GE requirements for students who do not meet the prerequisites.

 

 

History 300 GWAR

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of ENGLISH 214.

Are you interested in how historians uncover historical documents and figure out what they mean?  Do you want to know how and why historical interpretations change over time?  Then join History 300 to learn the nuts and bolts of history research, analysis and writing.  This is where you'll learn all the secrets about being a real historian.

Katz, T/TH, 11:10 - 12:25

Kudlick, T, 4:10 – 6:55

Mabalon, M/W, 2:10 – 3:25

Postel, M, 4:10 – 6:55

This course is required for all History Majors, who must pass with a C or better.  It cannot be taken CR/NC.

This course is the prerequisitee for history Proseminars (HIST 640,642,644)
 

History 313  Comparative History of Love and Sexuality (Full)

Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it… Is it that simple? Do we all approach love and sex in the same way? This course will look at documents about love and sex in a variety of contexts – from different times, in different places, by a variety of people. We will be looking at a diversity of sources in order to examine what might be shared about this experience and what might be different in different contexts. Topics will include love and courtship, unions, sexual identity, prostitution, and pornography.

Dr. Lisy-Wagner M, 4:10- 6:55

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities

SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP), Social Justice (SJ)

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  US,  Europe pre 1500, Europe after 1500, Asia, Middle East, Latin America, Africa, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

 

History 315 History of Science from the Scientific Revolution to the Present (Full)

Europeans’ discovery of the Americas (which had, of course, long been known to indigenous Americans!), provided an epistemological shock to intellectuals throughout Europe. The Greek and Roman thinkers which provided the basis for Renaissance knowledge had not known about the Americas, had not even guessed at them. Over the course of the early modern period, experience became the most important source of knowledge, rather than ancient texts. The foundations of modern science were laid on this new and growing emphasis on experience and experiments as the sites of knowledge production. As industrialization began to take hold, the development of science and technology escalated. People began to understand their universe in ways incomprehensible to the natural philosophers of the early modern period, and with modern technologies began to exploit their world’s natural resources on an unprecedented scale. This course will start with what historians have (perhaps problematically) called the Scientific Revolution and follow the story through to the present day. The narrative will largely focus on scientific developments in Europe and the United States, but will strive to incorporate connections with Africa, Asia, and Latin America and to respect the scientific traditions in those regions. The course will also look at the symbiotic relationship between people and the environment, focusing both on the ways that humans impact their environment and the ways that the natural world impacts human events.

Lisy-Wagner, M/W, 9:35 – 10:50

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities

SF Studies Environmental Sustainability (ES) and Global Perspectives (GP)

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  US or Europe after 1500

 

History 321 Hellenistic Greece

This course will explore the developments in the Mediterranean World from the rise of Alexander the Great until the Roman conquest (c. 350s – 30 BC). We will examine Alexander as both conqueror and destructor, and we will see what his successors did with his lands. This class is filled with political intrigue, brilliant maneuvers and amazingly poor decisions, heroic (and not so heroic) kings and righteous (and not so righteous) rebels, and a host of other topics.

PaffordT/TH 9:35-10:50

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500

 

History 328 Early Church to 313

Christian Church from its beginnings to the conversion of Constantine. Quest for the historical Jesus; Orthodoxy and Gnosticism; development of worship; the Apologists; the phenomenon of martyrdom.

Campbell, T/TH, 12:35 – 1:50

 

History 334 The Renaissance

What do you get when you cross unending warfare, catastrophic plagues, decaying institutions, and great art? Why, the Renaissance, of course. If that's not enough to interest you, we also have witches,\ religious upheaval, conflicted humanists, lost explorers, and nobles who accidentally set themselves on fire.

Rodriguez, M, 4:10 – 6:55

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500 and Europe after 1500

 

History 342 The French Revolution and Napoleon

Heads roll in this action-packed class on the French Revolution and Napoleon.  Learn why everyone hated Marie Antoinette, why Louis XVI (among others) lost his head, how African slaves in the colonies liberated themselves, how French armies overran Europe in the name of liberty and fraternity, and how Napoleon “saved” the Revolution (or so he claimed). We’ll explore the many paradoxes of this period (slavery vs. liberty for all, natural rights vs. women’s “nature,” democracy vs. the guillotine, liberation vs. occupation) in order to witness the messy birth of modern political culture.

Curtis, T/TH, 11:00 – 12:15

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis Europe after 1500
 

History 344 Nineteenth Century Europe

Learn how the world we live in today was largely shaped by historical changes in nineteenth-century Europe: industrialization, urbanization, mass politics, social reform, and European expansion overseas.  This course covers the period between one set of catastrophic wars (Napoleonic) and another (World War I), during which Europeans remade their politics and their society and dominated the world.  We will focus primarily on the experience of Britain, France, Germany, and Russia, balancing political, social, and cultural history.  Readings include novels, short stories, anarchist memoirs, and The Communist Manifesto.

Curtis, T/TH, 2:10 – 3:25

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis Europe after 1500

 

History 349 Medieval Popular Beliefs

What do you get when you mix saints, vampires, ghosts, angels, and demons and add a dash of piety, ritual, and inquisition? The world's weirdest recipe?  A really bad novel? A political campaign? We are not sure either, but if you take Medieval Popular Beliefs you will learn how these things ingrained themselves into the medieval imagination and shaped how the people in the Middle Ages saw and understood the world around them.

Rodriguez M/W 2:10-3:25

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe before 1500, Europe after 1500

 

History 386 Soviets, the West, and the Cold War

A survey of the world revolution in the period since world war two, when most of the world rose up against the rule of European imperialism, when Communism spread from Russia to China and thence to the rest of the world, including even western Europe, when the USA and its allies fought to resist the tide with every weapon at their disposal, including nuclear weapons, when war and revolution engulfed the globe, bringing tumult to the United States and the Soviet Union, when world culture emerged at its most creative and outrageous, in jazz, in rock, in psychedelia, in a permanent transformation of social and intellectual life, when the global capitalist economy was shaken from its faith in the gold standard and underwent fundamental reshaping, a trend, like the others listed in this rather long sentence, that is still with us.  We try to understand and philosophize about all of it as World History, through lectures, films, and discussions.  Original thinking encouraged; departures from orthodoxy warmly welcomed.  Texts include: Carole Fink, The Cold War; Greg Grandin, Kissinger’s Shadow; Anthony D’Agostino, Rise of Global Powers.    . 

D’agostino, T/ 4:10 – 6:55

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500

 

History 400 Modern European Imperialism

History 400 is a class about 19th and 20th century imperialism. Loosely defined, imperialism centers around the act of political subjugation of one peoples by another. However, imperialism by definition never entails complete assimilation culturally, economically, or (it turns out) politically. Thus it is more a give-and-take relationship than total domination; resistance to and subversion of the imperial mission is commonplace. It is also about gender, race, class, and culture. We will discuss ‘imperialism’ as an internalized ideology amongst Europeans. We will also look at imperialism’s partner – colonialism – in terms of the relationship between metropole and colony. The first part of this class will center upon a discussion of the origins and context from which modern imperialism arose. We will look closely at the reasons for, and events of, imperial expansion. Much of this course will be spent seeking to understand the reciprocity of the colonial relationship, as well as its ultimate oppression. We will consider modern non-European empires and finally look at decolonization.

Chekuri, T/TH, 11:10 – 12:25

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences

SF Studies: Global Perspectives, Social Justice

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500, Asia, Africa, Middle East, India, Latin America

 

History 405 Maritime History

Ahoy! In addition to employing terrible sea-related puns all semester, this class explores the history of the ocean and our relationship with it.  We will begin by examining the role of the sea and the seashore in the encounter between Europeans and American Indians, the Golden Age of piracy, and the "middle passage" of the transatlantic slave trade.  We will then turn to think about the industrialization of the ocean, covering topics ranging from whaling and fishing to cruise ships to Barbara Streisand’s beach house.  We also spend a day on mermaids! 

Crabtree, T/TH, 9:35 – 10:50

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe after 1500, US, Latin America, Africa

 

History 418 Society and Politics in US History

Rebels, Resisters and Reformers. This course will examine several instances of rebellion, resistance and reform in American History. Subjects include Shay’s Rebellion, Slave resistance and rebellion, William Lloyd Garrison and the immediate abolitionists, the Knights of Labor, the formation of the CIO, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Feminist Movement. Each subject will be explored as a historiographical problem with in-depth reading of a variety of historians.

Leikin, T, 4:10-6:55

Fulfills the following GE requirement: American Institutions, US History,

SF Studies : American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

 

History 420 American Colonial History

This course argues that colonial America is a myth – a politically useful but historically inaccurate portrait of early North America.  We discuss how this myth was created and why it has persisted, while also exploring the real people, places, and events that characterize the American colonies.  The class is divided loosely into thirds: the first section re-examines the relationships between American Indians and Europeans in borderland regions, the second narrates the emergence of a slave society in the English colonies, and the third asks how the thirteen colonies thought of themselves as part of and, eventually, separate from the British Empire.

Crabtree, T/TH, 2:10 – 3:25

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis US

 

History 421 Food Fight! The Politics of American Jewish Food Consumption

"You don't have to be Jewish to love Levy's Real Jewish Rye," the 1960s advertisement said. You don't have to be Jewish to love talking about American Jewish food, either. There may or may not be thematically appropriate snacks.

Gross, T/TH, 2:10- 3:25

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US History

 

History 427 History of US 1916 – 1945

Why did the United States enter the First World War and how did that change the country? Why did the “Roaring” 1920s give rise to the Harlem Renaissance and the 2nd Ku Klux Klan? What caused the Great Depression and how did Americans respond to economic collapse? How did the U.S. answer the rise of Nazism in Europe? Why did Japanese internment happen? What lay behind the decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki? And to what extent do we still live under the shadows of these events? This course explores these and other questions about some of the most tumultuous years in the history of the U.S. and the world.

Postel, M/W, 1:00 – 2:15

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US History

 

History 450 The History of California

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.” 

Viator, M/W, 11:10 – 12:25

Dreyfus, TH, 4:10 – 6:55

Sigmon, W, 4:10 – 6:55

Sigmon, M/W, 2:10 – 3:25 (Full)

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, California State and Local Government, UD-D: Social Sciences

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

 

History 451 Bay Area History and Society (Full)

Exploration of the Bay Area, specifically San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Jose, from a sociohistorical and global perspective. Exploration of various dimensions of the bay area's human and environmental composition and history, paying special attention to the built environment, immigration, globalization, race, and class.

Dr. Haskaj ONLINE

Dr. Livine ONLINE

Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science

SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM)

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 461 The United States and the World after 1913

In 1941, the publisher Henry Luce famously declared the 20th century to be “the first great American century.” Come learn how and why the United States became a superpower that has exerted its economic, cultural, military, and political influence all over the world

Elkind, M/W, 11:10 – 12:25

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US, Colonialism and Imperialism

 

History 465 American Ethnicity and Race Relations from 1890 (FULL)

Effects of ethnic and race relations on American life from the closing of the frontier to the present: Russian Jews, American Irish, Mexican Americans, Japanese, and African-Americans.

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, American Institutions, US History

SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

Mabalon, M/W, 11:10-12:25

 

History 468 Women in the US from 1890 to the present (FULL)

Gender has played a huge role in the 2016 presidential campaign.  Travel with us through the 20th century U.S. to explore the roots of today's debates regarding gender, feminism, and sexuality.  Learn about the New Women of the early 20th century who ventured into public spaces, secured the vote, and fought for birth control.  Follow diverse feminist movements across the rest of the century and explore the connections between feminism and unionization, civil rights, and gay liberation.  Explore, too, the powerful currents of resistance to changes in women's (and men's) roles. 

Katz, T/TH, 2:10-3:25

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Science

SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, or Gender, Sexuality, and the Body

 

History 470 US Constitution to 1877  (FULL)

“Four [eleven] score and seven [ten] years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in ... testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure."

Corea, T/TH, 12:35 – 1:50

Harris, T/TH, 9:35- 10:50 (Using historical reenacting games and mini-moot courts, we will see if we can come to understand the mix of people, principles, and politics that produced the single most important document of the past 250 years, as well as some of the key early efforts to interpret it. Perhaps we can better participate in the latest round of debates.)

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government

SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

 

History 471 US Constitution since 1877 (FULL)

In the summer of 2016, Muslim American Khizr Khan, the father of a U.S. soldier who had died in Afghanistan, famously asked Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump if he had even read the U.S. Constitution. In this class, students read the Constitution and study its history from the late nineteenth century to the present. We focus in particular on debates and discussions about the rights of immigrants, indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, poor people, racial minorities, sexual and gender minorities, women, and workers

Englander, T, 4:10-6:55

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government

SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

 

History 479 History and Literature of Baseball (FULL)

Come see how US History is reflected in our favorite pastime, and how changes in capitalism, race relations, technology, and gender expectations have been reflected on the field of play.

Sigmon, M, 4:10-6:55

History majors may count this towards the following areas of emphasis: US

 

History 501 Latin America: The National Period

Latin America often gets a bad rap. How should we instead tell stories of Latin America’s history of hopefulness? How do we acknowledge the diverse energies Latin Americans brought to forging the political and cultural systems of their new nations as they emerged beginning in the early nineteenth century? For particular times and places they clarified what it meant to be a citizen. This course explores the similarities and differences of those experiences in countries such as Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico.

Morrison, M/W, 9:35 – 10:50

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Latin America

 

History 524 History of Mexico

In this course, students examine selected themes in Mexican politics, economics, and culture, from the Spanish conquest in 1521 to the present. The course focuses initially on the blending of Spanish and Indian civilizations, and the emergence of a Mexican identity from Mexico’s colonial period. Students then explore the process of nation-building after independence in the 19th century, and assess agrarian conflict and revolution in the 20th century. The state’s ascent as the dominant force in Mexican society, the peculiar nature of Mexico's "one-party democracy," and the exhaustion of such a system after the year 2000, are the main themes of the course’s second half.

Arrieta, M/W/F, 1:10 – 2:00

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:Latin America, or US

 

History 535 History of Women in Latin America

Latin American gender relations defy simple explanations. While the U.S. has yet to elect a female president, Latin Americans have elected several. At the same time machismo is often invoked to explain the absence of women from important sites of social power. In the course, we will explore the lives of women in several social categories, from the famous to the everyday. We will also analyze how the region’s various notions of femininity and female power have changed over time.

Morrison, M/W, 12:35 – 1:50

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Latin America

 

History 569 Ancient Chinese Civilization (Full)

Prepare to be amazed by the rich array of heroes and antiheroes in the historical drama of ancient China. This course traces the evolution of Chinese civilization from the Neolithic through the end of the Tang dynasty, around 900. We will study the origin of Chinese civilization; the lives and thoughts of sagacious Confucians, care-free Taoists, Spartan Mohists, and Machiavellian Legalists; the unification of China by the tyrannical yet accomplished First Emperor of Qin; the rises and falls of subsequent dynasties Han, Six Dynasties, Sui, and Tang; the flowering of Buddhism; the opening of the legendary trade route Silk Road; and the formation of Chinese social and cultural tradition.

Hsu, M/W, 9:35-10:50

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences

SF Studies: Global Perspectives (GP)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia, or China

 

History 584 India and the British Empire

This course is an introduction to important themes in the encounter between India and the British Empire. Britain ruled India for nearly 200 years and influences of that history continue to be felt in both places to this day. In the course of the semester, we will examine how the encounter defined England and India as well as the regions of the Indian Ocean from the Middle East and Africa to Southeast Asia and Australia. We will look at how India came to be reordered under British rule and our main focus will be on the period from 1800 onwards. The readings will provide you a sampling of important cultural and political writings. While the study of the British Empire is a much larger discipline, this course will be limited to the period of British rule in India primarily. This course will also introduce you to some exciting themes, concepts and debates in the study of Indian history. The course is based on a combination of lectures, discussions, and student presentations. I expect students to take an active part in engaging the course readings as well as in class discussions. 

Chekuri, T/TH, 9:35 – 10:50

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities

SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP), Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:  Asia, Middle East, Europe After 1500, Africa

 

History 603 Ancient Near East to Muhammad

Pending

Campbell, T, 4:10 – 6:55

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe Pre-1500, Asia, Middle East

 

History 605 Islamic World II:  1500 to the Present

This course is a study of Islamic civilization (the Middle East), history, and culture from the 1700 to the present.  It focuses on a core region (the area between Nile and Oxus rivers).  Topics for the first part of the course include politics and society in the 18th and 19th centuries, the impact of European imperialism on the region's economy and culture, the response of regional (especially Ottoman) reform movements.  Topics for the second half of the course include the transformation of empires into nation-states, the rise of Arab nationalism, Arab-Israeli conflict, and the history of Iran, particularly its two 20th century revolutions.  The course also seeks to explain the rise of political Islam in light of its historical context. 

Behrooz, M/W, 11:10 – 12:25

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia or Middle East

 

History 633 Jewish History II: 1650 – Present

Given the choice, what would you do? Embrace the government’s promise of freedom even though you knew you would never be free? Preserve your ancient traditions even though it would separate you from your friends (and maybe even family)? Or, would you create your own ethnic and national revival to celebrate your heritage in a complicated new world? Welcome to modern Jewish history where ALL students are invited to journey through one of the most important and vexing questions of the last 300 years: what does it mean to maintain your traditions in the modern world? We’ll explore the European Enlightenment that led to the American revolution, the experiences of modern Jews in Europe, north Africa, and the United States, as well as the creation of the modern Zionist movement and the State of Israel.

Dollinger, T/TH, 11:00 – 12:15

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and/ or Humanities

SF Studies: Global Perspectives

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Middle East

 

History 640- Proseminar: Christians and Muslims Interactions in the Middle Ages

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

Christian-Muslim relations have a long and complex history dating back to the origins of Islam in the 7th century.  This course will examine that history by examining interactions between Muslims and Christians in the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages with a particular emphasis on Spain, North Africa, and the Levant.  It was in the Mediterranean that practitioners of the two faiths came into regular contact and fought, traded, exchanged ideas, and had personal relationships with each other.  The course will explore multiple aspects of this interaction including commerce, intellectual traditions, diplomatic relations, slavery, love, holy war, and gender issues.

Rodriguez, W, 4:10 – 6:55

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe pre-1500, Middle East, Africa

 

History 642- Proseminar: Reformers and Radicals

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

This is a course that explores the fascinating world of radicalism and reform, and the social movements that have struggled to make the United States a more just, humane, equal, and inclusive society. It will cover movements from the Union Leagues that fought for racial equality after the Civil War, to the Occupy Wall Street movement after the financial crash of 2008. It will focus on movements among racial minorities, women, labor, and other marginalized groups. And it will explore the ideas that influenced these movements, from anarchism and feminism, to populism and socialism.

Postel, M/W, 11:10 – 12:25

Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US

History 642- Proseminar: US Vietnam War

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of History 300 GWAR

Have you been watching Ken Burns' Vietnam War documentary and want to learn more?  Do you enjoy movies like Platoon, Forest Gump, and Tropic Thunder or protest music by Bob Dylan and the Beatles?   Would you like to have a better understanding of the most significant military defeat in US history and its legacy on American culture, politics, and foreign policy as well as world history?  This course places the Vietnam War within an international context and emphasizes both American and Vietnamese perspectives on this complex conflict. 

Elkind, M/W, 2:10 – 3:25

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, Asia, Colonialism, Imperialism

 

History 644- Proseminar: Travelers to the Dragon Kingdom

This fun and stimulating proseminar investigates cultural, economic, and political exchanges between China and her foreign visitors in imperial time through close study of five travelers’ accounts: Japanese Buddhist monk Ennin (9th century), Venetian merchant Marco Polo (13th century), Korean official Ch’oe Pu (15th century), Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (16th century), and British ambassador George Macartney (18th century). Students are also encouraged to compare the experiences of our travelers with that of another traveler that they are familiar with.

Hsu, T/TH, 2:10 – 3:25

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia, Europe before 1500,Europe after 1500