Fall 2020 Course Descriptions

If you started your program before Fall 2019 you may continue to use the Legacy Pattern towards graduation.  Please speak with an adviser who can help you choose the best route to graduation.

 

If you are unsure what type of class your online course is, Asynchronous, Synchronous or Hybrid, please use OUR GUIDE on the modes of online learning to help you unbderstand the way the times are marked and what class can better serve your needs this coming semster.

History 101 Critical Thinking: Dystopias

For thousands of years, human beings have been fascinated by dystopias or catastrophic and calamitous imaginings of the future.  We have used these dystopic visions to promote religious revelations, criticize and make sense of current conditions, and to create narratives that warn us off a certain historical path.  In every case, dystopias are firmly grounded in the historical moment in which they are created so they serve as revelatory documents as to that society found troublesome, unfair, or problematic. In this course, we are going to be examining multiple dystopias and using them as sources that allow us to think critically about specific historical periods and events. Our readings, assignments, and discussions will use dystopias to interrogate and analyze historical categories of analysis such as gender, race,class, and institutions.

Rodriguez Online M/W 12:30-1:45 (Synchronous)

History 103 History of Me 

All of history is someone’s life story, and everyone is a historian because they make and remake the story of themselves throughout their lives. One of the most important elements of the college experience is its role as a time where people can think through who they are, where they came from, and who they want to be. In this course, we will look at historical models and use techniques of historical research and writing to think through the questions: Who am I? Where did I come from? Where am I now? Where do I want to go? We will read autobiographies, oral histories, and histories of San Francisco State, and we will produce digital portfolios that collect our individual answers to our questions about identity in a variety of rhetorical genres.

Fullfills GE: E: Lifelong Learning Develop, Social Justice

Curtis T/Thurs. 4-6:45 Online (Sychronous)

Horowitz Online Thurs. 11-12:15 (Synchronous)

History 114 World History to 1500CE

This class will examine humanity's first agricultural endeavors to the first great world empires of the Classical period, to the introduction of Islam on the world stage. Developments in every aspect of the human experience are contextualized and explored using a global perspective to explore the foundations of science, politics, law, and artistic expression. 

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

Arrieta Online (Asynchronous)

Arrieta Online (Asynchronous) 

History 115 World History since 1500CE

The study of World History allows us to see how globalization took shape, how something as simple as a trade route also brought advances in technology, cultural exchange and understanding, the machines of war, and new religious and spiritual belief systems. Looking at our world beyond the “New World” and “Old World” paradigm allows us to see the depth and richness of the human experience, and to connect with cultures and our own past.

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

Behrooz T/R 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

Morrison Online (Asynchronous)

Behrooz M/W 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

History 120 US History to Reconstruction

The struggle is real! Learn how Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans vied for power in the "New World" and how gender, race, and wealth affected the social, cultural, and political development of America from the colonial period to the American Revolution, the Civil War, Native settlement and conquest, and Reconstruction.

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

Leikin Online (Asynchrnous)

Leikin Online (Asynchronous)

Arrieta Online (Asynchronous)

Arreita Online (Aynchronous)

History 121 US History since Reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

Requirement for the History Major

Sigmon Online (Asynchronous)

Sigmon M/W 9:30-10:45 (Synchronous)

Livie Online (Asynchronous)

Horowitz Online (Asynchronous)

Livie Online (Asynchronous)

History 130 US History for FOREIGN STUDENTS

PREREQUISITE: Studied US History at a non-US high school.

This course covers the breadth of US History, starting with its European roots circa 1400-1600 CE and culminating with Roosevelt’s New Deal.  

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D-2 Lower Division, AI American Institutions US History

This course will NOT count towards the history major, nor will it count towards GE requirements for students who do not meet the prerequisites.

Arrieta Online (Asynchronous)

History 300 GWAR

Are you interested in how historians uncover historical documents and figure out what they mean?  Do you want to know how and why historical interpretations change over time?  Then join History 300 to learn the nuts and bolts of history research, analysis and writing.  This is where you'll learn all the secrets about being a real historian.

This course is required for all History Majors, who must pass with a C or better.  It cannot be taken CR/NC.

Harris T/R 2:00-3:15 (Synchronous)

Posel M 4:00-6:45 (Synchronous)

Katz T/R 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

History 304 Teaching History with Comics

Once they were censored and banned. Now, graphic novels and comic books are recognized as both sources for understanding the past and—in some cases—histories in their own right. This is a class about how to teach history at the high school or college level using comic books. In this course, you will learn about United States imperialism and colonization, militarization and Cold War politics, the immigrant experience, and the Black Freedom struggle—all from graphic novels and comics! Equally, you will learn important lessons about teaching history, and even devise your own lesson plans around a topic of your choice. All of this material will prepare you for the day when you become a serious developer of comic books for the classroom or teach classes of your own!

Course Attributes: Elective Only

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Africa, Asia, or Europe after 1500]

Getz T/R 12:30-1:45 (Synchronous)

History 311 Ancient Mediterranean World in Transition: c. 1600-700 BCE

Prerequisites: Upper division standing, or consent of instructor; ENG 214 or equivalent.

Examination of the cultural developments, contributions, and influences of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Persia, Crete, Anatolia, Greece, and Arabia from the dawn of civilization to the birth of Muhammad.

Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, Area Studies: Europe

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis Europe before 1500]

Campbell Online (Asynchronous)

HIST 321 Hellenistic Greece

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; GE Area E; or consent of the instructor.

Political, institutional, and cultural history of Greece from the end of the 5th century to 146 B.C.E.

Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, Area Studies: Europe

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis Europe before 1500]

Pafford Online (Asynchronous)

History 331 The High Middle Ages

Ever wonder where all your favorite books, movies and TV shows got their inspiration? Then come explore the middle Ages, without which our pop culture would mostly consist of lawyer dramas, reality to, "talent” competitions, and cat GIFs. Also, learn about the origins of modern systems of government, education, law, culture, and thought.
 

Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, Area Studies: Europe

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis Europe before 1500]

Rodriguez Online (Asynchronous)

History 342 The French Revolution and Napoleon

Heads roll in this action-packed class on the French Revolution and Napoleon.  Learn why everyone hated Marie Antoinette, why Louis XVI (among others) lost his head, how African slaves in the colonies liberated themselves, how French armies overran Europe in the name of liberty and fraternity, and how Napoleon “saved” the Revolution (or so he claimed). We’ll explore the many paradoxes of this period (slavery vs. liberty for all, natural rights vs. women’s “nature,” democracy vs. the guillotine, liberation vs. occupation) in order to witness the messy birth of modern political culture.

Course Attributes: Area Studies (Europe)

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis Europe after 1500]

Curtis T/R 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

History 343 Soviets, the West, and the Cold War

A survey of the global Cold War.  At center stage is the nuclear arms race and the ideological and political confrontation between the two superpowers.  We want to try to understand how their cooperation against the fascists in World War Two was transformed into a hostile standoff in the center of Europe that threatened the incineration of the planet.  We trace this antagonism through the revolutionary events in the third world and up to the fall of Soviet Communism in the Gorbachev reforms. 

Course Attributes: Elective Only

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis Europe after 1500]

D'Agostino T/R 12:30-1:45 (Synchronous)

History 357 Colonial Latin America

Latin America after 1492 was not just the story of conquistador victors and indigenous victims. This course prompts students to understand the complex experiences created by the Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule in the Americas. Students are encouraged to explore the lives and political behaviors of the African-American, European-American, indigenous, and mestizo “peoples that formed societies in colonial Latin American by chance and by design” between 1492 and 1823.  Special consideration is also given to the Spanish-American background to the formation of the United States.

Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, Area Studies

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Latin America]

Morrison M/W 9:30-10:45 (Synchronous)

History 360 Ancient Chinese Civilization

Prepare to be amazed by the rich array of heroes and antiheroes in the historical drama of ancient China. This course traces the evolution of Chinese civilization from the Neolithic through the end of the Tang dynasty, around 900. We will study the origin of Chinese civilization; the lives and thoughts of sagacious Confucians, care-free Taoists, Spartan Mohists, and Machiavellian Legalists; the unification of China by the tyrannical yet accomplished First Emperor of Qin; the rises and falls of subsequent dynasties Han, Six Dynasties, Sui, and Tang; the flowering of Buddhism; the opening of the legendary trade route Silk Road; and the formation of Chinese social and cultural tradition.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences

SF Studies: Global Perspectives (GP)

Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, Area Studies

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: China, or Asia]

Hsu M/W 9:30-10:45 (Synchronous)

History 361 Imperial China

Do you believe that China was the first country on earth to enter modernity? Do you know that humor can be a subject of serious historical study? The purpose of this course is to journey through Imperial China from 900 to 1700 to investigate the disappearance of the aristocracy, the construction of state bureaucracy, the evolution of the ethical teaching of Neo-Confucianism, the integration of China into world economy, the onslaught of “barbarian” rules, the interactions with Southeast Asia, Japan, and the West, the changing gender relations, and the rise of vernacular literature (including jokes). So buckle up!

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)

Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, Area Studies
[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: China or Asia]

Hsu M/W 12:30-1:45 (Synchronous)

History 366 Approaches to the African Past

Working with language, physical evidence, images, oral testimony, and texts, we explore themes including the peopling of the continent, the construction of enduring societies, the experiences of colonialism and apartheid, the struggle for independence, and the quest for reconciliation and healing. 

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-D Social Sciences

SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP),

Course Attributes: Area Studies

[ Legacy Pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis:  Africa]

Morrison M/W 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

History 372 India and the British Empire

This course is an introduction to important themes in the encounter between India and the British Empire. Britain ruled India for nearly 200 years and influences of that history continue to be felt in both places to this day. In the course of the semester, we will examine how the encounter defined England and India as well as the regions of the Indian Ocean from the Middle East and Africa to Southeast Asia and Australia. We will look at how India came to be reordered under British rule and our main focus will be on the period from 1800 onwards. The readings will provide you a sampling of important cultural and political writings. While the study of the British Empire is a much larger discipline, this course will be limited to the period of British rule in India primarily. This course will also introduce you to some exciting themes, concepts and debates in the study of Indian history. The course is based on a combination of lectures, discussions, and student presentations. I expect students to take an active part in engaging the course readings as well as in class discussions.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Social Sciences

SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP), Social Justice (SJ)

Course Attributes: Area Studies 

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: India or Asia]

Chekuri T/R 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

History 374 Bollywood and Beyond: Indian History Through Film 

Examination of Indian history since 1947 through Indian film. Introduction to modern Indian culture and society. Examination of films produced in each of the decades since 1947 to explore the changing political and social dynamics of India. The stories that are told through film capture everything from the dreams, desires, and fantasies of Indians to their complex political and social locations in an ever-changing society.

Course Attributes: Area Studies 

[Legacy pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: India or Asia]

Chekuri Online (Asynchronous)

History 380 Islamic World I: 500-1500

This is a study of Islamic civilization, culture and history from 500 to 1700 CE.  The course assumes no prior knowledge of Islam or Middle Eastern history.  The course emphasizes on a core region of the Islamic world (the area between Nile and Oxus rivers).  The first part of the course begins with an investigation of the pre-Islamic world and goes on to survey the rise of Islam as a religion and an empire.  Next, the golden age of Islamic civilization, covering the Umayyad Empire (centered in Damascus) and the Abbasid Empire (centered in Baghdad), will be covered.  The second half of the course will examine the Islamic civilization from the decline of the Abbasid Empire (950 CE) through the establishment of regional empires, the Crusades, the Mongol invasion and the emergence of the "gun-powder empires."  The course will pay special attention to cultural and religious development in the Islamic world, as well as political changes.  Students will be able to discuss and analyze the rise of Islam both as religion and civilization.  Students will examine ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversities of the Islamic civilization.

Course Attributes: Area Studies

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Middle East]

Behrooz W 4:00-6:45 (Synchronous)

History 420 American Colonial History

This course argues that colonial America is a myth – a politically useful but historically inaccurate portrait of early North America.  We discuss how this myth was created and why it has persisted, while also exploring the real people, places, and events that characterize the American colonies.  The class is divided loosely into thirds: the first section re-examines the relationships between American Indians and Europeans in borderland regions, the second narrates the emergence of a slave society in the English colonies, and the third asks how the thirteen colonies thought of themselves as part of and, eventually, separate from the British Empire.

Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis US]

Crabtree Online (Asynchronous)

History 422 The American Revolution

Join up for the true tale of how and why a bunch of colonial amateurs took on the most powerful empire in the world, and find out how slaves, women, Native Americans, and the Continental Congress shaped the founding of the United States.

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis US]

Wolf M/W 12:30-1:45 (Synchronous)

History 428 History of the US Since 1945 

The Bomb. Backyard barbecues. Lunch counter sit-ins. Stonewall. The March on Washington. The Kennedy Assassination. The Suburbs. The Sexual Revolution. Vietnam. The Black Freedom Struggle. From Truman to Obama, the postwar suburbs and urban redevelopment, shopping malls to drive-in movies, from Watergate to Iran Contra and from the Cold War to the War on Terror -- this course covers the major political, economic, social, cultural and diplomatic themes and topics in United States history from the end of World War II to the 1970s. In particular, we will focus on the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and American foreign policy after World War II, social movements, suburbanization and urban redevelopment, changing gender roles, civil rights and identity politics, the resurgence of conservatism, race and racism, and the impact of immigration. Throughout the course, we will examine issues of race and racial oppression, gender and sexism, identity, class and culture in postwar America.

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Postel T/R 9:30-10:45 (Synchronous)

History 450 The History of California

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.” 

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, California State and Local Government, UD-D: Social Sciences

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Sigmon M/W 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

Sigmon M 4:00-6:45 (Synchronous)

Sigmon Online (Asynchronous)

History 451 Bay Area History and Society

Exploration of the Bay Area, specifically San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Jose, from a sociohistorical and global perspective. Exploration of various dimensions of the bay area's human and environmental composition and history, paying special attention to the built environment, immigration, globalization, race, and class.

Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science

SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM)

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Section 1: Online (Hybrid)

Section 2: Online (Asynchronous)

Section 3: Online (Asynchronous)

History 460 US Foreign Relations to 1913

Want to learn more about how thirteen colonies on the eastern seaboard of North America became a continental and global empire in just over 100 years?  We’ll study many aspects US foreign relations from the revolutionary period to the outbreak of World War I, including interactions with Native Americans, territorial and economic expansion, and cultural diplomacy.

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Elkind  T 2:00-3:15 (Hybrid)

History 464 American Ethnic and Racial Relations to 1890 

This course provides a historical introduction to one of the issues that currently vexes our society most: race. But “race” is a relatively new term; in fact, it is an idea that grew out the colonial history of the Americas, where European-descended people invoked their own superiority to justify their domination over those with Native American or African ancestry, and where English people thought themselves superior to Irish or Spanish people. This course traces that history in the places that became part of the United States and examines British-American and US history in comparison to French- and Spanish-American history from the 1600s to the 1880s.
Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-C Arts and Humanities
SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM), Global Perspectives (GP) and Social Justice (SJ)
Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Wolf M/W 9:30-10:45 (Synchronous)

History 467 Women in the US to 1890

American women differ by race, class, ethnicity, age, culture, sexual orientation, and family situation.  Yet gender remains a significant category for historical study.  This course examines the histories of women in the United States from pre-Columbian times to 1890

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Crabtree T/R 12:30-1:45 (Hybrid)

History 470 US Constitution to 1877

Inventing our country was a messy and convoluted business. Noble and expedient, eternal and ephemeral, legal and political: writing and implementing our Constitution involved great minds, great principles, and great compromises. The premise of this course is that the best way to understand what happened is to try to get inside the heads of those who wrestled with the issues of government, society, race, money, and war and peace.

In order to do that, the largest portion of the course will be devoted to a student-driven reenactments of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and the debate on the abolition of Slavery during the Civil War, using the historical role-playing games model of the “Reacting to the Past” program. In each game, each student will be assigned a specific role—such as James Madison, William Seward, or Charles Pinckney—informed by real historical events and the ideas of important thinkers and political leaders. Each student will critically analyze those ideas and circumstances and present oral and written arguments in debates on such issues as slavery, commerce, and how to allocate the powers of government.

Fullfills the following GE Requirements: U.S. Govt CA State Local Govt, U.S. History, UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities, Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities, Social Justice

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

T/R 9:30-10:45 (Synchronous)

History 471 US Constitution since 1896

This class will look at the constitutional and legal history in the United States from the Civil War to the present.  Students will analyze primary source documents, including landmark Supreme Court opinions as well as the writings of leading historians.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government

SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

T/R 11:00-12:15 (Synchronous)

Online (Asynchronous)

T 4:00-6:45 (Synchronous)

History 474 History of Labor in the United States 

What does it mean to be an American worker?  How have working people in the United States reacted to this nation's evolution from a land of farmers into a prominent industrial power?  In what ways have workers shaped this transformation?  Students will consider these questions by following America's ever-changing working class through time, and by examining workers' institutional and non-institutional responses to the problems they have faced in life and labor.  We will address the impact of changing work processes on laboring men and women, as well as the influence of multiple allegiances of class, gender, race and ethnicity in shaping the various ideologies, social movements, labor unions and political parties spawned or supported by the workers in the United States.

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Leikin R 4:00-6:45 (Synchronous)

History 481 Thought and Culture in America 1880 to the Present

What is intellectual and cultural history? Whose history is it? And why does it matter? This course explores these questions. It is organized around the reading of fiction, philosophy, and social commentary representing a wide range of schools of thought. It will cover the positivist and pragmatist thinkers of the turn of the century; the inter-war Lost Generation and Harlem Renaissance; the post-war Beats, feminists, and New Left; and the post-colonial and modern conservative intellectual movements. There will also be a film interlude, looking at New Deal culture through the lens of 1930s Hollywood.

Course Attributes: US History

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: US]

Postel T/R 12:30-1:45 (Synchronous)

 

Proseminars:

 

History 696.1 The Era of Globalization

A seminar on world history, 1968-2008, the era of Globalization in world politics and in the world economy.  Focus is on the wild reaction of elites to the wars and revolutions of the sixties.  We have to consider the oil shocks that completely reshaped the world’s money flows, the fall of the Soviet Bloc, the scramble for the spoils of Eurasia, the rise of revolutionary Islam in various forms, the emergence of new power centers in Russia and China, and the global economic crash of 2008.  Quite a wild ride.  Is it a prelude to world war three?  Usually globalism is described entirely in terms of economics and technology.  But I think ideas and power provide a more lucid story.  Time to demystify Globalization.   The nature of the topic is that a wide range of students with different course work and interests can bring their thoughts to bear on it.  This is the world that has shaped our present and future, and may have come to a crashing end in the Covid-19 pandemic.  Let us look it in the face, warts and all.  

Course Attributes: Required Course

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US, Europe after 1500, Asia]

D'Agostino T 4:00-6:45 (Synchronous)

History 696.2 Travelers to the Dragon Kingdom

This fun and stimulating proseminar investigates cultural, economic, and political exchanges between China and her foreign visitors in imperial time through close study of five travelers’ accounts: Japanese Buddhist monk Ennin (9th century), Venetian merchant Marco Polo (13th century), Korean official Ch’oe Pu (15th century), Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci (16th century), and British ambassador George Macartney (18th century). Students are also encouraged to compare the experiences of our travelers with that of another traveler that they are familiar with.

Course Attributes: Required Course

[Legacy Pattern Majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Asia, Europe before 1500]

Hsu M 4:00-6:45 (Synchronous)

History 696.3 California

Does the story of California and the West reveal what America is, or does it tell us what America isn’t? This proseminar will introduce you to some of the latest and most groundbreaking scholarship exploring these big questions. The course will also offer hands-on training in research and writing – something useful for students in any discipline and with any career goal. Students will write reading responses, discuss books, and craft a 15-20 pages paper on a topic chosen within the history of California and the West.

Course Attributes: Required Course

[Legacy pattern Majors may count this towards the following emphasis: US History]

Viator M/W 2:00-3:15 (Synchronous)