Summer 2019 Course Schedule

History 114 World History to 1500CE

This class will examine humanities first agricultural endeavors to the first great world empires of the Classical period, to the introduction of Islam on the world stage. Developments in every aspect of the human experience are contextualized and explored using a global perspective to explore the foundations of science, politics, law, and artistic expression. 

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D1-Lower Division,

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

History 110 and 111 or History 114 and 115 are required to complete the History Major

R1 M/W 9:00-1:00

History 121 US History since Reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

Requirement for the History Major

R1 M/W 1:15-5:15

History 121 US History since Reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

Requirement for the History Major

R3 Online

History 320 Archaic and Classical Greece

Democracy, philosophy, togas – these are some of the hallmarks of ancient Greece. But these are only a part of what made early Greek society unique. In this class, we will explore ancient Greece from the early Mycenaean kingdoms and their collapse to the resurgence of Greek power in the Archaic and Classical periods. The Greeks arose as a distant people in an already ancient world, both learning from and challenging older more established powers. Greek cultural and political developments resulted in a formidable people who alone could stand up to the power of the mighty Persian Empire. Their potential was only limited by their inability to work together – a fractiousness that resulted in civil war. In this class, we will look at the political and social developments of the Greeks from their earliest historical period to the end of the Peloponnesian War, which ushered in the era of Alexander the Great. Numerous primary sources will be used to explore the ancient Greeks and how they saw themselves and the world that they inhabited.
Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)
Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis: Europe before 1500
R1 T/R 1:15-5:15
 

History 450 The History of California

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.” 

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, California State and Local Government, UD-D: Social Sciences

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

R3 M/W 1:15-5:15

History 471 US Constitution since 1877

In the summer of 2016, Muslim American Khizr Khan, the father of a U.S. soldier who had died in Afghanistan, famously asked Republican Party presidential candidate Donald Trump if he had even read the U.S. Constitution. In this class, students read the Constitution and study its history from the late nineteenth century to the present. We focus in particular on debates and discussions about the rights of immigrants, indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, poor people, racial minorities, sexual and gender minorities, women, and workers

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government

SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

R3 M/W 9:00-1:00

History 620 Pirates and Piracy 

This course surveys the development and nature of pirates and piracy from ancient to modern times. No band of outlaws has so caught our imagination as pirates. Swashbucklers and buccaneers abound in popular culture as the nature of pirates has been increasingly romanticized. Just how accurate are these modern depictions of pirates? In this class we will explore the historical reality of pirates and piracy through the ages, from ancient Greece and Rome to modern days. Who were pirates and how were they seen and depicted by contemporary peoples? How was piracy dealt with? Actual first hand sources concerning pirates and the fight against them will be utilized throughout the class.

History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: Europe Pre-1500, Europe Post-1500, Asia, Africa

R1 T/R 9:00-1:00