Summer 2020 Course Descriptions

Starting in Fall 2019 there will no longer be Areas of Emphasis. If you started your program before Fall 2019 you may continue to use the Legacy option or you may switch to the new pattern.

There are updated planning forms available for both the traditional and the new Bachelors in History. As always, we encourage you to come in and meet with an adviser. Students who get advising graduate on time. 

Summer Session 1 (R1):

History 120 US History to Reconstruction

The struggle is real! Learn how Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans vied for power in the "New World" and how gender, race, and wealth affected the social, cultural, and political development of America from the colonial period to the American Revolution, the Civil War, Native settlement and conquest, and Reconstruction.

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

 

Arrieta Online

 

History 315 History of Science from the Scientific Revolution to the Present

Europeans’ discovery of the Americas (which had, of course, long been known to indigenous Americans!), provided an epistemological shock to intellectuals throughout Europe. The Greek and Roman thinkers which provided the basis for Renaissance knowledge had not known about the Americas, had not even guessed at them. Over the course of the early modern period, experience became the most important source of knowledge, rather than ancient texts. The foundations of modern science were laid on this new and growing emphasis on experience and experiments as the sites of knowledge production. As industrialization began to take hold, the development of science and technology escalated. People began to understand their universe in ways incomprehensible to the natural philosophers of the early modern period, and with modern technologies began to exploit their world’s natural resources on an unprecedented scale. This course will start with what historians have (perhaps problematically) called the Scientific Revolution and follow the story through to the present day. The narrative will largely focus on scientific developments in Europe and the United States, but will strive to incorporate connections with Africa, Asia, and Latin America and to respect the scientific traditions in those regions. The course will also look at the symbiotic relationship between people and the environment, focusing both on the ways that humans impact their environment and the ways that the natural world impacts human events.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities

SF Studies Environmental Sustainability (ES) and Global Perspectives (GP)

Prior to Fall 2019 Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  US, World, or Europe after 1500

After Fall 2019 Course Attributes: Elective Only

 

Pena-Guzman ONLINE

 

History 320 Archaic and Classical Greece

Democracy, philosophy, togas – these are some of the hallmarks of ancient Greece. But these are only a part of what made early Greek society unique. In this class, we will explore ancient Greece from the early Mycenaean kingdoms and their collapse to the resurgence of Greek power in the Archaic and Classical periods. The Greeks arose as a distant people in an already ancient world, both learning from and challenging older more established powers. Greek cultural and political developments resulted in a formidable people who alone could stand up to the power of the mighty Persian Empire. Their potential was only limited by their inability to work together – a fractiousness that resulted in civil war. In this class, we will look at the political and social developments of the Greeks from their earliest historical period to the end of the Peloponnesian War, which ushered in the era of Alexander the Great. Numerous primary sources will be used to explore the ancient Greeks and how they saw themselves and the world that they inhabited.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities
SF Studies Global Perspectives (GP)

Prior to Fall 2019 Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  Europe before 1500

After Fall 2019 Course Attributes: Chronological Breadth, Area Studies Europe

 

Campbell ONLINE

 

History 355 History of Women in Latin America

Latin American gender relations defy simple explanations. While the U.S. has yet to elect a female president, Latin Americans have elected several. At the same time machismo is often invoked to explain the absence of women from important sites of social power. In the course, we will explore the lives of women in several social categories, from the famous to the everyday. We will also analyze how the region’s various notions of femininity and female power have changed over time.

 

Prior to Fall 2019 Majors may count this course towards the following areas of emphasis:  World or Latin American History

After Fall 2019 Course Attributes: Area Studies

 

Morrison Online

 

History 451 Bay Area History and Society (FULL)

Exploration of the Bay Area, specifically San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and San Jose, from a sociohistorical and global perspective. Exploration of various dimensions of the bay area's human and environmental composition and history, paying special attention to the built environment, immigration, globalization, race, and class.

Fulfills the following GE requirement: UD-D Social Science

SF Studies: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM)

Prior to Fall 2019 History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

After Fall 2019 Course Attributes: US History

 

ONLINE 

 

Summer Session 3 (R3):

History 121 US History since Reconstruction

The struggle continues! From picking up the pieces after the Civil War and expanding rights to a greater segment of the population, to entering the economic, political, and often embattled world stage, this class explores how America has become the country we know today.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: D2-Lower Division, AI American Institutions, US History

SF Studies: GP (Global Perspectives)

 

SIgmon ONLINE

 

History 450 The History of California

Time magazine once noted, “If America is the land where the world goes in search of miracles and redemption, California is the land where Americans go.” This survey course will explore the history of California, from its native past to its present, as both a geographical place and as an idea as laden with expectation as the American Promised Land itself. Topics will include indigenous cultures and pre-contact California; exploration and conquest; frontier labor, economies, and societies; water and agriculture; urban growth and decline; migration and immigration; gender, race, ethnicity, and citizenship; political cultures and trends; Hollywood and the popular culture industry; and the perpetual myth of California as the Promised Land, or “America’s America.” 

Fulfills the following GE requirements:  American Institutions, California State and Local Government, UD-D: Social Sciences

Prior to Fall 2019 History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

After Fall 2019 Course Attributes: US History

 

Sigmon Online

 

History 471 US Constitution since 1896 (FULL)

This class will look at the constitutional and legal history in the United States from the Civil War to the present.  Students will analyze primary source documents, including landmark Supreme Court opinions as well as the writings of leading historians.

Fulfills the following GE requirements: UD-C Arts and Humanities, American Institutions US History, US Government and California State and Local Government

SF Studies American Ethnic and Racial Minorities (AERM) and Social Justice (SJ)

Prior to Fall 2019 History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

After Fall 2019 Course Attributes: US History

 

M/W 1:15-5:15 

 

History 489 Dynamics of the American City

Prerequisites: Successful completion of GE Areas A1, A2, A3, and B4; ENG 214 or equivalent; or consent of the instructor.

Historical development and contemporary condition of urban America, city planning, federal-city relations; dynamics of urban policy-making; class, gender, race, and ethnicity in urban America. 
(This course is offered as USP 400 and HIST 489. Students may not repeat the course under an alternate prefix.)

Course Attributes:

·      UD-D: Social Sciences

·      Social Justice

Prior to Fall 2019 History majors may count this towards the following area of emphasis: US

After Fall 2019 Course Attributes: Elective Only

 

Pamuk Online